Gateway Trail 2024 calendar

By Loretta Cozart

The Gateway Trail board shared its 2024 calendar of events at the Trailhead,  at 807 S. Battleground Ave. in Kings Mountain.
• Friday, March 15, 6 p.m., Sunset Bike Ride, 10-mile ride, bring your own bike at the
Kings Mountain Gateway Trail. See the sunset on top of the Plateau.
Contact the Carolina Thread Trail or  Bret at 704 342-3330 ext. 2216 for information.
• Saturday, March 23, The Bear Run 2024, 5K and 10Mile Runs, 5K starts at 8:30 a.m., and 10mile starts at 9:15 a.m. Sign up at www.runsignup.com or for information. Call 704 685-3549 or 704 739-9663. Packet Pick Up, Friday, March 22, from 3 to 6 p.m. or before runs.
• Monday, April 8, Penumbral Eclipse on the Plateau, meet at the trailhead at 11:30 a.m. The actual eclipse will be from 12:53 to 2:15 p.m., 80% to 83%. For information, call 704 734-2725 or 704 739-9663. Gator can ride folks up to the plateau, or you can take a nice walk.
• Saturday, April 20, Earth Day Event at the Trail, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Vendors, music, food, crafts. Call 704 730-2101 or 704 739-9663 for more information.

Girl Talk 3rd Annual Prom Dress Giveaway

By Loretta  Cozart

Girl Talk Ministry in partnership with Book Me Boo Events & Rentals will hold its 3rd Annual Prom Dress Giveaway on March 23 and 24 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Bynum Chapel Family Life Center at 311 Ellis Street in Kings Mountain.
Any girl who may be going to prom or has a middle school dance may register at https://linktr.ee/girltalkministry. Slots fill quickly, so register soon. This year’s event is open to all local middle and high school students.
In the fall of 2021, Tiana Roberts started Girl Talk Ministry. This program allows minority girls to discuss everyday life challenges and empower one another on ways to rise above adversities. The program allows adolescent girls to transform their minds and enhance a better life through Christ.
Now Girl Talk Ministry has begun collecting prom dresses for 2024 proms. You can help by donating your new or gently used dress to allow girls in our community to attend this magical milestone they've been waiting on all their lives! It is a fantastic way to begin spring cleaning and do a kind deed for a young woman in our community. Several drop-off locations are available in Kings Mountain and Shelby.
For further information, email girltalkministry01@gmail.com

Bethware  Elementary
spelling bee winners

Fourth graders participated in Bethware Elementary School's annual spelling bee on Friday, Jan. 26.  Liam Presness (right) won first place, with Graham Watson (left) as runner-up. Liam will represent the school at the Cleveland Co. Schools spelling bee on Feb. 15th.

Cleveland Co. Choral Society
Spring concert rehearsals

Cleveland County Choral Society announces the commencement of its Spring Concert rehearsals every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. beginning on February 6. They invite you to gather with them at Aldersgate UMC, at 1207 W Dixon Blvd. in Shelby, for an enriching musical experience.
As a welcoming non-audition choir, they invite singers from all backgrounds to participate. To support its endeavors, there are dues of $30 per season, payable by cash or check to the Cleveland County Choral Society. Your contribution helps create memorable musical experiences.
The choir’s Spring Concert blends mesmerizing choral and musical theatre pieces. From the soulful “Daniel, Servant of the Lord” by Andrew Parr to the enchanting melodies of “Ubi Caritas” from Taizé and Mack Walberg’s “Bound for the Promised Land,” the first half promises to be a treat. The second half dives into the world of Musical Theatre, featuring iconic pieces like “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” “Singing in the Rain,” “All I Ask of You,” “Bring Him Home,” and “For Good” from Wicked, and many more.
Cleveland County Choral Society invites you to “immerse yourself in music this spring! our concerts are on the first weekend of May. New members are welcome during the first three rehearsals. Remember, membership closes after this period. Closing Step into a world of music and camaraderie. Your voice is a valuable addition to our choir. Let’s make this season unforgettable together. See you at the rehearsals!”
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This early photo of downtown Kings Mountain was taken by Lamar Herndon.

Remembering Kings Mountain’s 42 Anniversary

By Loretta Cozart

On Sunday, February 11, Kings Mountain celebrates its official 150th anniversary. One hundred and nine years ago, on April 22, 1915, W.A. Mauney celebrated the event in grand fashion at the Mountain View Hotel. This is the story that ran in the Kings Mountain Herald to commemorate the event.
“42 Years in
Kings Mountain
  Esq. W.A. Mauney Celebrates 42 in
 this Locality”
“One of the most enjoyable social events of the season was a banquet given at the Mountain View Hotel last Thursday night by Esq. W.A. Mauney in celebration of his 42nd anniversary in the Town of Kings Mountain.
“Seated at the festal board were the following who enjoyed the hospitality of their host and pastime attending the reunion: Reverand C.K. Bell presiding at the head of the table, Capt. F. Dilling and Miss Virginia Mauney, Esq. W.A. Mauney and Mrs. Mauney, J.S. Mauney and Mrs. Mauney, R.P. Roberts and Mrs. Roberts of Cherokee Falls, S.C., G.W. Cornwell and Mrs. Cornwell, M.M. Carpenter and Mrs. Carpenter, C.E. Neisler and Mrs. Neisler, V.A. Ridenhour and Mrs. Ridenhour, D. Hunter Mauney and Mrs. Mauney of Cherryville, W. Sylvanus Mauney and Joe Garrett, Dr. J. Sidney Hood, and G.G. Page.
“Reverand C.K. Bell invoked upon God’s blessing upon those assembled and upon the bountiful  repertoire the guests were soon to participate. When we say that the food was prepared and served at the Mountain View Hotel, that bespoke the quality of what was set before that hungry twenty-three. The superior quality of the various ingredients entering into the menu and the excellency with which it was prepared and served was all together above criticism. Capt. Dilling stated that he had sat with three hundred in the Waldorf in New York behind a twenty-five-dollar plate which had failed to bring the satisfaction to his inner man that this meal had done.
“The meal over and the board cleared, the cigars were passed, and the speechmaking began. Esq. W.A. Mauney and Rev. C.K. Bell exchanged seats and Mr. Mauney became toastmaster. In the opening remarks, Mr. Mauney started with the feeling that he was indeed thankful that there were a few of the first settlers alive and that they could get together and recount the things of days gone by, renew old associations, and rehearse some of their experiences of younger days. Re reviewed all his guests and found that all belonged to his party either by family ties or seniority, except for Messrs Bell, Hood, and Page. He stated he wanted the preacher to say the blessing, the doctor for service in case of overeating, and the editor to tell about the meeting. The doctor was the only one of the three who was not called upon to perform his assigned function. Everybody ate, and the probability is that everybody ate too much, doctor and all, but the roar of laughter and which followed took care of any extra digestion.”
The story continued, but it was impossible to read. The digital copy blurred in scanning. Nonetheless, it was great to read how the forefathers of Kings Mountain celebrated the town’s 42nd anniversary. If weather permits, visit your favorite spot in town to celebrate the sesquicentennial in your own unique way.
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Pictured L-R: Pastor King and Pastor Ghandour. (Photo by Advent Lutheran Church)

New pastor installed at
Advent Lutheran Church

Reverend Samar Ghandour was installed as a called pastor to Advent Lutheran Church on Sunday, January 28 by Reverend Steven King, Dean of the Southern Piedmont Mission District of the Carolinas Mission Region, North American Lutheran Church (NALC). Guests included pastors from the NALC along with friends from other congregations and numerous members of Pastor Ghandour’s family. Special music was provided by members of Abiding Presence Lutheran Church, York, SC and the Advent Lutheran Church choir.
Pastor Ghandour is a native of Liberia, West Africa. Following graduation from high school, he entered the Liberia Assemblies of God Bible College to prepare for ministry. Upon graduation, he went to the Nairobi International School of Theology in Nairobi, Kenya where he was awarded the Masters of Art in Christian Ministry in 1989 and Hood Theology Seminary in Salisbury, NC where he was awarded the M. Div. in 2001.
He was ordained to ministry of Word and sacraments in 2017 with the NALC. He and his wife Grace have three daughters - Gertrude, Samantha, and Hadassah. Pastor Ghandour has extensive experience in the mission field. He most recently served as Executive Director of Victory Ministries, which has an intentional vision to share Christ with the Islamic and unreached people in the interior of Liberia, training pastors, church leaders, evangelists, preachers and laypeople in their villages.
The NALC is committed to shaping its life around four core values: Christ Centered, Mission Driven, Traditionally Grounded and Congregationally Focused.
Advent Lutheran Church is a member of the North American Lutheran Church (NALC) and is located at 230 Oak Grove Road in Kings Mountain. You may reach us at 704-750-0171.
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Carolyn Paysour was Kings Mountain Rotary’s first female member, and this photo ran in the Kings Mountain Herald’s March 1, 1989, edition. (Photo from Herald archives)

Pieces of  Kings Mountain History

By Loretta Cozart

The Kings Mountain Rotary Club was established on October 30, 1958, with the following charter members: Dr. Paul K. Ausley, Clyde T. Bennett, Dorus L. Bennett, W.D. Byers, J.E. Childers, Charles E. Dixon, Carl P. Finger, E. Wilson Griffin, Myers Hambright, Ralph A. Johnson, Haywood E. Lynch, E.C. Martin, George E. Mauney, Hoyle D. (Snooks) McDaniel, Paul H. McGinnis, Richard M. McGinnis, Jack R. Mercier, Tom L. Trott, Thermon L. Warlick, Jack H. White, and Fred J. Wright, Jr.
The group initially met every Thursday at 12:15 at La Royale Restaurant on Shelby Road. Tom Trott, a former member of another club, and Haywood Lynch were credited for the club’s formation. During the first few months, Sheriff Haywood Allen, Grady Howard of KM Hospital, and Senator Robert Morgan were among the speakers.
During the Charter night ceremony on Monday, December 15, 1958, Shelby Rotarian President Tom Moore donated the club’s bell and gavel.
In March 1959, the club’s first service project was to reactivate the Davidson Boy Scout Camp off York Road at the then New City Water Lake. The road required improvement, and a gate needed to be installed.
In 1989, Rotary International approved women for membership. Carolyn Paysour was the first female member in the Kings Mountain Rotary Club, followed by Melissa Lawrence and Loretta Cozart.
This year marks the 66th anniversary of the Kings Mountain Rotary Club. The club has served the Kings Mountain community for nearly seven decades through various service projects and scholarships, exemplifying Rotary’s principal motto, “Service Above Self.” The club’s annual Spaghetti Supper, held before the Homecoming Game, is now the highlight of their fundraising efforts. Over the years, the club has also organized golf tournaments and playhouse giveaways. In 2005, they spruced up Patriots Park, adding flower gardens, brick walkways, and a splash pad. The club still meets every Thursday at noon for lunch at the H. Lawrence Patrick Senior Center at 909 E King St. 
Rotary is 1.4 million passionate individuals in 46,000+ clubs worldwide. Rotary members believe they have a shared responsibility to act on the world’s most persistent issues. Our 46,000+ clubs work together to promote peace, fight disease, provide clean water, sanitation, and hygiene, save mothers and children, support education, grow local economies, and protect the environment.
They serve others, promote integrity, and advance world understanding, goodwill, and
peace through our fellowship of business, professional, and community leaders. Their vision is that together, we see a world where people unite and take action to create lasting change — across the globe, in our communities, and in themselves.
Rotary International provides Rotary Peace Fellowships, Rotary Community Corps, Rotary Youth Leadership Awards, Rotary Youth Exchange, New Generations Service Exchange, Grants, and Scholarships.
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Rev. Robert Patrick, III Pastor Boyce Memorial AARP

An Invitation to Communion with Jesus

The Bible is filled with gracious invitations extended by God, both in the Old Testament and the New. During this month, we have considered just a few of the invitations extended by Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew. In these, we have heard Jesus call sinners to turn from misery and destruction to find life and blessing through faith in Him. These aren’t just invitations, they are commands! Jesus alone can grant forgiveness of sin and righteousness that God will accept on the day of judgment.
The last of Jesus’ invitations we will consider is also an imperative command, but it is extended to a particular people. It is only for those who have already come to Him in faith. We hear it in Matthew 26 as Jesus is in a room with His disciples at Passover. As they were eating the Passover meal, “Jesus took bread, and after blessing it broke it and gave it to the disciples, and said, ‘Take, eat; this is my body.’ And He took a cup, and when He had given thanks He gave it to them, saying, ‘Drink of it, all of you, for this is My blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins. I tell you I will not drink again of this fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new with you in My Father’s kingdom.”
The Passover meal was an annual feast which God commanded His people to keep in remembrance of their miraculous deliverance from slavery in Egypt. Moses, through whom the LORD had given the Passover ordinance, promised in Deuteronomy 18, “The LORD your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among you, from your brothers—it is to him you shall listen...” After Jesus’ resurrection, Peter, preaching in the temple, declared in Acts 3 that Jesus was that prophet to Whom God’s people must listen! The Apostle Paul referred to Jesus in 1 Corinthians 5 as “our Passover Lamb” Who has been sacrificed! All of the Old Testament anticipates the ministry of Jesus Christ.
It is in light of all of this that Jesus, on the very night He was betrayed, first instituted the Lord’s Supper as a sacramental meal. He used imperatives as He invited His disciples to, “Take, eat...” and “Drink...of My blood of the covenant...” This would seem remarkably strange if the Old Testament had not included meals and other signs instituted by God as outward signs and seals of His gracious spiritual blessings. In the Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, Jesus bids His followers to partake of elements that represent His body and blood, thereby “feeding” on Him in a spiritual way that nourishes our faith.
Luke and Paul both include Jesus’ instruction to “do this in remembrance of Me,” as the Lord’s Supper serves as a memorial of what Jesus has done. But Jesus invites those who belong to Him to do more than remember. When Jesus said He will drink “this fruit of the vine” in His Father’s Kingdom, He is anticipating of another meal. Our call to the Lord’s Supper serves as an invitation to the wedding supper of the Lamb in heaven when all God’s people finally will be glorified with Him! Jesus’ invites us now to feed on Him by faith so that we are given strength for today. But our remembrance of what He has already done for us also gives us bright hope for tomorrow. All who have come to Him in faith are invited to partake of the Lord’s Supper. If you wish to know more of this invitation, don’t hesitate to contact me, or any of the faithful gospel preachers and believers of Kings Mountain. We long to find a table filled with those we know and love who belong to Jesus!

February Events and Activities
in and Nearby Kings Mountain

By Loretta Cozart

Are you feeling a bit of cabin fever? Winter weather does not have to restrict your activities. February presents numerous entertainment and recreation choices that suit every taste and interest. Whether you're a history buff, a nature enthusiast, or a food lover, there's something for everyone within a 35-mile radius of Kings Mountain, NC.
Kings Mountain has its fair share of events and activities happening in February. Kings Mountain National Military Park, which preserves the site of the Revolutionary War battle and commemorates the first major victory to occur after the British invasion of Charleston in 1780, offers hiking trails, a multimedia presentation, a museum, and a visitor center, showcasing the military service, weapons, equipment, and life skills of frontiersmen involved. Open Wednesday through Sunday, it's an educational and immersive experience for children and adults.
If you're more inclined toward the arts, the Kings Mountain Little Theatre is showcasing a production of "Clue" on February 23rd, 24th, and 25th and continues on March 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. This lively, suspenseful comedy-drama "Who-Done-It?" is based on a popular board game and will keep audiences guessing and laughing the entire performance. Shows take place in the Joy Performance Center, downtown Kings Mountain.
Girls aged five to eleven are invited to a fun Valentine's event, "Let Me Call You Sweetheart," on February 9th. Wear your Valentine's Day outfit, learn a dance, do a craft, play games, and enjoy a special snack with your friends. RSVP and travel to 510 Sunbeam Farm Road in Cherryville, NC, for this OnStage Productions social experience. Tickets are limited, and a small fee is involved.
Nature lovers should head to the Carolina Thread Trail, a trail network that spans multiple counties. Within a 10-mile radius of Kings Mountain, you can find several sections of the trail offering scenic views, peaceful walks, and opportunities for birdwatching. Pack a picnic and spend a day exploring the beauty of the Carolina Thread Trail.
Ready to tie up a few loose ends? Bring your materials and join a step-by-step beginner class to learn how to crochet at 5:00 pm on Thursday, February 15th, at the Mad Crafters, 134 W Virginia Ave, Bessemer City, NC. An intermediate crochet class is also available at 5:00 pm on Tuesday, February 27th. Either class requires a small fee.
Venturing a bit further, within a 20-mile radius of Kings Mountain, there are even more events and activities to discover. The Gaston County Museum of Art and History in Dallas offers a glimpse into the region's rich history and showcases rotating exhibits of local artwork. Take a guided tour to learn about the area's cultural heritage and appreciate the talent of local artists.
For a day of family-friendly fun, head to Shelby City Park in Shelby, NC. This expansive park offers a range of activities, including playgrounds, walking trails, and a miniature train ride. Pack a picnic, let the kids run wild on the playground, and take a stroll through the beautiful park.
Are you looking for something fresh that you can sink your teeth into? Visit the Foothills Uptown Shelby Market on Saturdays from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm. This farmers' market, located at 126 West Marion Street in Shelby, NC, features a variety of regional vendors offering seasonal produce, local crafts, and other treasures.
February offers many family-friendly events and activities in and around Kings Mountain, NC. The Schiele Museum of Natural History in Gastonia is a great place to spend a day with the family. Explore the museum's interactive exhibits, learn about dinosaurs, fossils, and wildlife, and participate in hands-on activities. The Schiele Museum is both educational and entertaining, making it a hit with kids of all ages.
For those who enjoy the great outdoors despite sometimes chilly conditions, Kings Mountain’s Gateway Trail offers the chance to get out, exercise, and get some fresh air without having to drive far. Just south of downtown Kings Mountain on Battleground Avenue, the Gateway Trail offers exercise and beauty along various loops that range from easy to moderately strenuous. The Loop Trail is the first right off the rail and runs for approximately 0.3 miles to Cardio, Foote, or Loop Trail entrances, where there are views of the quarry. Cardo Hill features a beautiful overlook of the city of Kings Mountain and surrounding areas. The Plateau Trail and Loop circle a beautiful butterfly garden with a gravel footpath.
If you're up for a challenge, the Kings Mountain State Park in Blacksburg, South Carolina, offers hiking trails that lead to the summit of Kings Mountain. The rewarding panoramic views from the top make the strenuous hike worth it. Pack a picnic and take in the breathtaking scenery while enjoying the peacefulness of nature.
Another hiking option, Crowders Mountain State Park, is a short drive into Gaston County from Kings Mountain. Crowders Mountain State Park boasts two mountain peaks offering magnificent views of Piedmont. Trails offer challenging hikes, towering cliffs, and even the opportunity to traverse two states through the Ridgeline Trail, which connects to Kings Mountain State Park and Kings Mountain National Military Park in South Carolina. A wide variety of resident birds, from songbirds to birds of prey, make the park a great spot for birdwatching.
For a more leisurely Winter outdoor experience, the Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden in Belmont is a haven of beauty and tranquility. Explore the stunning gardens featuring a variety of plants and flowers and take a walk along the walking trails. The Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden is the perfect place to relax and rejuvenate amidst nature's splendors.
   February is filled with cultural and arts events in and around Kings Mountain. Southern Arts Society’s “Small Wonders” exhibit runs from Feb. 3 through March 1. In addition, a variety of activities and events are held each month. February’s calendar includes:
• Feb 1, 8, 15, 22 – Open Studio Sessions Every Thurs 10 am – 12 pm or later
• Feb 3, Sat – Reception for Small Wonders 6-8 pm, Awards at 7 pm
• Feb 6, Tue – SASi Program TBA – 7 pm, doors open at 6:30
• Feb 13, Tues – Shutter Light Photography Group Meeting 7 pm
• Feb 21, Wed – Knit & Crochet Group Meeting 10:30 am
• Feb 29, Thu – Color Pencil Group Meeting 6:00 pm (Leap Day!)
•  Mar 1 is the last day for the Small Wonders Exhibit. Pick up work on March 2
For rainy-day sports enthusiasts, February 2024 brings various sports and recreation events in Kings Mountain, NC, and the surrounding areas. The Kings Mountain YMCA hosts a wide range of fitness classes, from yoga to Zumba to cycling. Get your heart pumping and stay active during these group exercise sessions.
For those who enjoy a round of golf, the Kings Mountain Country Club offers a challenging course with scenic views. Sunny days will help you perfect your swing and enjoy a day on the greens surrounded by beautiful landscapes.
In February, there is something for everyone, from historical tours to outdoor adventures to cultural experiences to shopping experiences. Whether you're a resident or a visitor, make the most of this exciting month by attending the events and exploring the activities outlined in this article. Don't miss the opportunity to immerse yourself in the rich history, vibrant culture, and natural beauty of Kings Mountain, Cleveland County, and surrounding areas. Get out of the winter doldrums, mark your calendars, and get ready to create lasting memories.
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North Elementary School Spelling Bee winner Nina Escobar (left) and runner-up Norma Thompson proudly display their certificates.

North Elementary
spelling bee winners

By Loretta Cozart

North Elementary School’s Spelling Bee winner, Nina Escobar, will represent the school at the Cleveland County Spelling Bee at the District Level. Norma Thompson is the runner-up.
The Cleveland County Schools Spelling Bee will be held on February 15, from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., at the Central Services building at 400 W. Marion Street in Shelby.

 
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As visitors file in, the caller prepares for Bingo.

A little competition can
be good for the soul

By Loretta Cozart

Patrick Senior Center held a Team Pride Party before playing Bingo last Thursday. Attendees wore their favorite teams’ colors and shared fun and fellowship with snacks before Bingo began. Kings Mountain High School, Appalachian State University, Ohio State, Duke, UNC Tar Heels, FSU, Clemson, USC Gamecocks, Pittsburg Steelers, and the Panthers were represented. At the end of this day, all who joined in the fun were the ultimate winners.

See more photos on page 8A of
January 31, 2024 KM Herald

Senior Center
Valentine’s Dance
Friday, Feb. 9

The Patrick Senior Center in Kings Mountain will host a Valentine’s Dance on Friday, February 9, from 7 to 9 p.m. Area adults ages 55 and up are welcome.
The cost is $3 per person, and funds go to our pet food pantry. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, please call the Patrick Senior Center at 704-734-0447.

February Events and Activities in and Nearby Kings Mountain

By Loretta Cozart

Are you feeling a bit of cabin fever? Winter weather does not have to restrict your activities. February presents numerous entertainment and recreation choices that suit every taste and interest. Whether you're a history buff, a nature enthusiast, or a food lover, there's something for everyone within a 35-mile radius of Kings Mountain, NC.
Kings Mountain has its fair share of events and activities happening in February. Kings Mountain National Military Park, which preserves the site of the Revolutionary War battle and commemorates the first major victory to occur after the British invasion of Charleston in 1780, offers hiking trails, a multimedia presentation, a museum, and a visitor center, showcasing the military service, weapons, equipment, and life skills of frontiersmen involved. Open Wednesday through Sunday, it's an educational and immersive experience for children and adults.
If you're more inclined toward the arts, the Kings Mountain Little Theatre is showcasing a production of "Clue" on February 23rd, 24th, and 25th and continues on March 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. This lively, suspenseful comedy-drama "Who-Done-It?" is based on a popular board game and will keep audiences guessing and laughing the entire performance. Shows take place in the Joy Performance Center, downtown Kings Mountain.
Girls aged five to eleven are invited to a fun Valentine's event, "Let Me Call You Sweetheart," on February 9th. Wear your Valentine's Day outfit, learn a dance, do a craft, play games, and enjoy a special snack with your friends. RSVP and travel to 510 Sunbeam Farm Road in Cherryville, NC, for this OnStage Productions social experience. Tickets are limited, and a small fee is involved.
Nature lovers should head to the Carolina Thread Trail, a trail network that spans multiple counties. Within a 10-mile radius of Kings Mountain, you can find several sections of the trail offering scenic views, peaceful walks, and opportunities for birdwatching. Pack a picnic and spend a day exploring the beauty of the Carolina Thread Trail.
Ready to tie up a few loose ends? Bring your materials and join a step-by-step beginner class to learn how to crochet at 5:00 pm on Thursday, February 15th, at the Mad Crafters, 134 W Virginia Ave, Bessemer City, NC. An intermediate crochet class is also available at 5:00 pm on Tuesday, February 27th. Either class requires a small fee.
Venturing a bit further, within a 20-mile radius of Kings Mountain, there are even more events and activities to discover. The Gaston County Museum of Art and History in Dallas offers a glimpse into the region's rich history and showcases rotating exhibits of local artwork. Take a guided tour to learn about the area's cultural heritage and appreciate the talent of local artists.
For a day of family-friendly fun, head to Shelby City Park in Shelby, NC. This expansive park offers a range of activities, including playgrounds, walking trails, and a miniature train ride. Pack a picnic, let the kids run wild on the playground, and take a stroll through the beautiful park.
Are you looking for something fresh that you can sink your teeth into? Visit the Foothills Uptown Shelby Market on Saturdays from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm. This farmers' market, located at 126 West Marion Street in Shelby, NC, features a variety of regional vendors offering seasonal produce, local crafts, and other treasures.
February offers many family-friendly events and activities in and around Kings Mountain, NC. The Schiele Museum of Natural History in Gastonia is a great place to spend a day with the family. Explore the museum's interactive exhibits, learn about dinosaurs, fossils, and wildlife, and participate in hands-on activities. The Schiele Museum is both educational and entertaining, making it a hit with kids of all ages.
For those who enjoy the great outdoors despite sometimes chilly conditions, Kings Mountain’s Gateway Trail offers the chance to get out, exercise, and get some fresh air without having to drive far. Just south of downtown Kings Mountain on Battleground Avenue, the Gateway Trail offers exercise and beauty along various loops that range from easy to moderately strenuous. The Loop Trail is the first right off the rail and runs for approximately 0.3 miles to Cardio, Foote, or Loop Trail entrances, where there are views of the quarry. Cardo Hill features a beautiful overlook of the city of Kings Mountain and surrounding areas. The Plateau Trail and Loop circle a beautiful butterfly garden with a gravel footpath.
If you're up for a challenge, the Kings Mountain State Park in Blacksburg, South Carolina, offers hiking trails that lead to the summit of Kings Mountain. The rewarding panoramic views from the top make the strenuous hike worth it. Pack a picnic and take in the breathtaking scenery while enjoying the peacefulness of nature.
Another hiking option, Crowders Mountain State Park, is a short drive into Gaston County from Kings Mountain. Crowders Mountain State Park boasts two mountain peaks offering magnificent views of Piedmont. Trails offer challenging hikes, towering cliffs, and even the opportunity to traverse two states through the Ridgeline Trail, which connects to Kings Mountain State Park and Kings Mountain National Military Park in South Carolina. A wide variety of resident birds, from songbirds to birds of prey, make the park a great spot for birdwatching.
For a more leisurely Winter outdoor experience, the Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden in Belmont is a haven of beauty and tranquility. Explore the stunning gardens featuring a variety of plants and flowers and take a walk along the walking trails. The Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden is the perfect place to relax and rejuvenate amidst nature's splendors.
   February is filled with cultural and arts events in and around Kings Mountain. Southern Arts Society’s “Small Wonders” exhibit runs from Feb. 3 through March 1. In addition, a variety of activities and events are held each month. February’s calendar includes:
• Feb 1, 8, 15, 22 – Open Studio Sessions Every Thurs 10 am – 12 pm or later
• Feb 3, Sat – Reception for Small Wonders 6-8 pm, Awards at 7 pm
• Feb 6, Tue – SASi Program TBA – 7 pm, doors open at 6:30
• Feb 13, Tues – Shutter Light Photography Group Meeting 7 pm
• Feb 21, Wed – Knit & Crochet Group Meeting 10:30 am
• Feb 29, Thu – Color Pencil Group Meeting 6:00 pm (Leap Day!)
•  Mar 1 is the last day for the Small Wonders Exhibit. Pick up work on March 2
For rainy-day sports enthusiasts, February 2024 brings various sports and recreation events in Kings Mountain, NC, and the surrounding areas. The Kings Mountain YMCA hosts a wide range of fitness classes, from yoga to Zumba to cycling. Get your heart pumping and stay active during these group exercise sessions.
For those who enjoy a round of golf, the Kings Mountain Country Club offers a challenging course with scenic views. Sunny days will help you perfect your swing and enjoy a day on the greens surrounded by beautiful landscapes.
In February, there is something for everyone, from historical tours to outdoor adventures to cultural experiences to shopping experiences. Whether you're a resident or a visitor, make the most of this exciting month by attending the events and exploring the activities outlined in this article. Don't miss the opportunity to immerse yourself in the rich history, vibrant culture, and natural beauty of Kings Mountain, Cleveland County, and surrounding areas. Get out of the winter doldrums, mark your calendars, and get ready to create lasting memories.
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Melton receives Certificate of License for gospel ministry
Bethlehem Baptist Church in Kings Mountain presented John Harmon Melton a Certificate of License for the gospel ministry last Sunday. “God has truly gifted John to preach His word and shepherd His church. We are truly honored to have John and Summer here and fully affirm their ministry,” said Bethlehem Baptist Pastor Steve Taylor. Pictured L-R:  John Harmon Melton and his wife, Summer Melton, with Bethlehem Baptist Pastor Dr. Steve Taylor and wife, Tois Taylor. (Photo by Anna Hughes)
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Rev. Robert Patrick, III Pastor Boyce Memorial AARP

An Invitation to Come to Him
as Children

The Bible is full of gracious invitations from the LORD, which are commands for all people to turn from their sin and its misery to find life and blessing in Him. This month we have considered just a few of the invitations extended by Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew. These have included the invitation to repent in light of the nearness of His Kingdom, the invitation to find rest for one’s soul, and the invitation to deny oneself and take up one’s cross to follow Jesus. All of these are beautiful offers of blessing through faith in Jesus Christ.
In this penultimate article of the month, we consider what might be among the most precious of Jesus’ invitations. It was offered after His disciples, thinking they were sparing Him trouble, turned away parents who brought their young children to Him for blessing. When Jesus saw this happening in Matthew 19, He gave this invitation: “Let the little children come to Me and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of heaven.” After saying this, Jesus laid His hands on the children and blessed them!
The children Jesus blessed didn’t bring themselves. They were probably too young to come on their own. They were dependent on loving parents who brought them to Jesus for blessing. In a similar manner, the corruption of sin has left all people incapable of any spiritual life or goodness on their own. We can’t and won’t come to Jesus for blessing on our own. Yet our heavenly Father brings us to Him for blessing. In His high priestly prayer in John 17, Jesus says to His Father, “I have manifested Your name to the people whom You gave me out of the world. Yours they were, and You gave them to me, and they have kept Your word.” The kingdom belongs to us because the Father has given us to Jesus, and Jesus blesses us with citizenship in His kingdom!
When we come to Jesus, we are not only like little children in our dependence upon our Father to bring us to Him. We must also be like children in our trust. A child taken in the arms of a trusted, caring adult feels secure. To possess a “childlike faith” should not be understood as being juvenile in understanding, but to be devoted and trusting of the One to Whom we look for blessing. As children received the embrace of Jesus long ago, so to this day we who belong to Him should be sure that we are in His grip; we have a place in His kingdom!
No matter how old anyone may be, Jesus’ invitation is to come as children to a loving Father or elder brother. Those who come by faith find blessings of eternal life. He takes us by the hand and promises glory with Him forever more. He forgives our sin and calls us to leave behind all corruption and everything that has enslaved us in misery. HIs perfect righteousness is credited to us in the sight of God. This embrace of our Savior brings great assurance. Are you willing to see in yourself the likeness of a child? Are you trusting Jesus for a secure place in His kingdom for evermore? Come like a little child, loving and trusting Him!
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LORETTA COZART

Pieces of  Kings Mountain History

Today, I would like to share the story of Mary McKeehan Patton with you. Some might wonder why I’m writing about Mary Patton in this week’s column. She deserves our attention and recognition as a DAR patriot for providing over five hundred pounds of gunpowder to the Overmountain Men, led by William Campbell, during the Revolutionary
War. Patton’s gunpowder was crucial to the victory over Major Patrick Ferguson’s British troops. Even after the war was over, Patton continued to manufacture and deliver gunpowder to local customers. However, when asked by Sevier, she provided the powder for free, despite being able to sell it for $1 per pound, or $500.
Despite her invaluable contribution to the nation’s liberty, Mary Patton is not recognized by the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution as a patriot. When I asked why, I was told that it was because she was paid for the powder. This is a grave injustice to Patton’s legacy.
Patton was born in England in 1751 and immigrated to Pennsylvania with her family in the late 1760s. She learned the art of gunpowder making during her apprenticeship, most likely from her father, David McKeehan. In 1772, she married John Patton, an Irish immigrant who served as a private in the Pennsylvania militia early in the American Revolution.
The Pattons manufactured gunpowder in the Cumberland County region of Pennsylvania. After selling their Carlisle powder mill for cash, the couple migrated to the Overmountain region of North Carolina, which is now Eastern Tennessee. With the help of family friend Andrew Taylor, they established a mill on Powder Branch adjacent to the Taylor homeplace. Even after the war, Patton continued to manufacture and deliver gunpowder to local customers.
Last week, Hayne Neisler sent me the story of Mary Patton which stirred in me again the desire to get recognition for Mary. The story was taken from a September 1924 edition of the Boston Globe. In it, her descendant shared her story titled ‘’Mary Patton - Gunpowder that Won Crucial Battle of Revolution was Made by Heroic Mountain Woman.’’
The article read, “The gunpowder that won the battle of Kings Mountain, which was the turning point in the American fight for freedom, was never paid for and was the gift to her country’s cause of heroic mountain woman such is the trend of an age-old historic story unearthed last week.
“Marry Patton, before marriage Mary McKeehen, born and reared in England contributed to a great extent to the death of Colonel Ferguson, the defeat of the ‘’red coats’’- her countrymen, and to the independence of her adopted people and yet until last week her name was unknown to the people who live in sight of the famous battleground, a shrine to the hearts of American lovers of freedom.
The revelation of the true story of Mary Patton could not have come at a better time. Week after next, thousands of Americans will gather at Kings Mountain in celebration of the 144th anniversary of the famous battle. On Route 1, near Shelby, lives Mrs. S.E Goforth, a direct descendant of Mary Patton. In a trunk of valuables, she found an old newspaper account that brought to light the story of Mary Patton,” the story read.
“According to the old newspaper, Mary furnished 500 pounds of powder to Shelby, Sevier, and Campbell, from a small powder mill she and her husband ran near Buffalo Creek. The patriots marching were desperately short of power, which was a serious concern to the patriot leaders. Although her normal fee was one dollar a pound, she furnished the powder as a gift. Powder from Patton’s Mill dealt out death to the invaders: Ferguson, who had boasted that ‘’all Hell’’ could not move him from Kings Mountain, was shot dead, probably by a bullet shot with Mary Patton’s powder.”
   This is a story that was shared by The Boston Globe almost a century ago. It tells the tale of a woman who gifted gunpowder to the patriots. According to the article, it is highly probable that this is true since very few people had $500 in cash at that time.
   In 1774, the British Parliament passed an Act that prohibited firearms and gunpowder. There are stories that confirm similar incidents that occurred locally, where guns and ammunition were confiscated from locals by the British and Loyalists. Despite the fact that making gunpowder was considered an act of treason which was punishable by death, Mary Patton manufactured and provided the patriots with the necessary supplies, ignoring the risks. For this reason, Mary Patton should be recognized as a patriot by everyone in America.
    Mary Patton died on December 15, 1836, and was buried in Patton-Simmons Cemetery near Sycamore Shoals, Tennessee. The family tradition of gunpowder manufacturing continued until after the Civil War when the powder mill was sold.
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Patrick Senior Center February events

The Patrick Center is a SHIIP site and can help with Medicare questions and check to see if you qualify for Extra Help with your drug costs. We can also assist with transportation, loan equipment, incontinence supplies, nutritional supplements, and other services.
   Please call the center at 704-734-0447 for more information or to sign up for programs. Programs are open to people ages 55 and up unless otherwise noted.
February 2024 Special Events:
Crafts with Terry from the Mauney Memorial Library: Monday, February 5, 10 am-12 pm. Learn to use etching cream and make plain glass gorgeous. Class is free; all supplies are provided. Call or come by the front desk to sign up.
Basic Computer Classes: Mondays and Wednesdays, 10 am-12 pm. New sessions will be from February 5 through March 18. Call the Center to pre-register. You must attend one of the first two classes to be enrolled.
Women’s Health Series: Tuesday, February 6, 12-1 pm. Join us to learn about sensitive health topics for older women. Please call to sign up.
Sign Language Classes by Clarity Language Access, LLC: Thursdays, February 8 through March 28, 1-2 pm. Classes are free; all materials will be provided. Call the Center to sign up.
Valentine’s Dance: Friday, February 9, 7-9 pm. Come and dance the night away! Cost is $3 per person. Funds go to our Pet Food Pantry.
Technology Presentation by Trey from Mauney Memorial Library: Monday, February 12, 10-11 am. Learn more about Bluetooth.
Cookie Decorating Class: Monday, February 12, 11:30 am-12:30 pm. Learn how to decorate Valentine’s Day cookies. All are supposed to be provided. Cost is $5. Sign up and pay at the front desk.
Black History Month Event: Tuesday, February 13, 9:30-11 am. Celebrate a Day of the Arts! Educate, Elevate! RSVP by Tuesday, February 6.
Diabetes Education and Support Group (Sponsored by Hopscotch Primary Care): Tuesday, February 20, 9:30-11 am. Join us to learn about the management and treatment of Diabetes.
Craft Class with Claudia: Tuesday, February 20, 1-3 pm. Join Claudia to do a fun craft project. Cost is $2. Sign up and pay a fee at the front desk before February 13.
Trip to the Schiele Museum and Firestone Grill in Gastonia: Monday, February 26, 9:30 am-3 pm. Cost is $12. Sign up and pay at the front desk. Registration will begin 30 days before the trip. KM residents with a 28086 zip code will be given 3 days of priority registration.
Art Night with Janie: Thursday, February 29, 5:15-7:15 pm. Sign up and pay the $20 fee at the front desk by the Thursday before the class. All supplies provided.
Ongoing Activities at the Patrick Center
Ceramics: Mondays, 9:30-11:30 am.
Facebook Chat: Mondays, 10-10:45 am. (Online via Facebook)
Seniors in Motion: Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays, 10:30 am-11:30 am. A suggested donation of $1 per class for non-YMCA members.
Quilting: Mondays, 12:30-3 pm.
Beginner Quilting: Thursdays, 10 am-12 pm & 1-3 pm.
Intermediate Line Dance (Dance Floor Rockers): Mondays, 1-3 pm.
Intermediate Line Dance (Southern Class): Thursdays, 10-11:30 am.
Beginner Line Dancing: Mondays, 11:30-12:30 pm.
Clogging: Mondays, 3:30-4:30 pm & Thursdays, 12:30-1:30 pm.
Knitting: Tuesdays, 8:30-10:30 am.
Veterans Meeting: 1st Tuesdays, 9-10 am.
Bible History: Tuesdays, 10-11 am.
Monthly Birthday Celebration: 4th Tuesdays, 10-11 am.
REFIT Dance Exercise: Tuesdays, 11 am-12 pm.
Basic Sewing Class: Tuesdays, 11 am-2 pm.
Volunteer Meeting: 3rd Tuesdays, 12:15-1 pm.
Chair Volleyball: Tuesdays, 1-3 pm and Fridays, 12-2 pm.
Canasta: Tuesdays, 1-3 pm.
Tai Chi for Arthritis: Wednesdays, 9-10am.
Jewelry Class: Wednesdays, 10-11am.
Dulcimer Class: 2nd Wednesdays, 10:15 am. If you plan to attend, please call to let us know if you will be bringing your own dulcimer.
Chair Yoga: Wednesdays, 11:45-12:45 pm. ($3 Fee).
Dutch Lunch Bunch: 2nd Wednesdays. February 14 – Culver’s Restaurant in Belmont. Please sign up at the Front Desk and pay the $2 bus fee.
Blood Pressure Check: 1st Wednesdays, 10-11:30 am.
Food Giveaway: 3rd Wednesdays, 1-2:30 pm. Please call to sign up each month.
Book Club by Mari with Mauney Memorial Library: 4th Wednesdays, 1-2 pm at the Patrick Center. Please call Mari at 704-739-2371 for more information.
Healthy Lifestyles Class: Thursdays, 8-9:30 am.
Gentle Exercise: Thursdays, 9:30-10:15 am.
Bingo: Thursdays, 10:30-11:15 am.
Peaceful Painting: Thursdays, 12-1 pm. Try relaxation through painting. The class is free, but please bring your own multimedia book.
Bridge: 2nd and 4th Thursdays, 1-4 pm.
Coffee & Conversation: Fridays, 8:30-10 am.
Dulcimer Jam: Fridays, 9-10 am.
Chorus: Fridays, 10-11 am.
Friday Lunch: Fridays, 11 am-12 pm. Call to sign up by Thursday at Noon. Cost is $4.
WII Bowling League: Fridays, 12-1 pm.
Ping Pong/Corn Hole: Fridays, 12-2 pm.
Shred Truck: Truck will be here on February 28 to shred onsite, but you can bring your items to be shredded at any time the center is open and put them in the locked bins in the lobby.
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February Library news

By Mari Slaughter

Mauney Memorial Library has the following events scheduled for February. The library is at 100 S. Piedmont Avenue, Kings Mountain, NC 28086. For the latest in library news and events, visit www.mauneylibrary.org.
The Library will be closed in honor of President’s Day from Saturday, February 17, to Monday, February 19.
Book Club: “The Trackers” by Charles Frazier (Adult)
Monday, February 5, 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Join the Mauney Library book club and meet with people every month to discuss popular books. Contact info@mauneylibrary.org to join!
Afternoon Adventures – Coding with Trey (Ages 6-12) (Registration Required)
Wednesday, February 7, 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Learn AI and machine learning fundamentals in this month’s Afternoon Adventure!
Field Trip to the African American Museum of History and Culture at Loray Mill
Friday, February 9, 10:00 am – 11:00 am
Meet us there!
Introduction to Backyard Poultry (Adult) (Registration Required)
Monday, February 12, 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Join us to learn some basics about raising a small flock of chickens. Topics covered will include selecting chicks, properly housing your flock, feeding and nutrition, and predator prevention. Presented by Lauren Greene, NC Cooperative Extension Area Specialized Agent for Poultry in Western NC.
Seed Starting Party (Adults and Teens) (Registration Required)
Wednesday, February 14, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Come learn how to jump-start your seeds for springtime planting in a low-maintenance way. All materials will be provided. Presented by Judy Ford, Cleveland County Master Gardener.
Lego Club (ages 6-12)
Third Thursday of every month, 3:30 pm -4:30 pm
Library Community Room
Free build and participate in group projects; snacks provided.
Composting Workshop (Adults) (Registration Required)
Wednesday, February 21, 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
What is compost, how do you make it, and how do you use it? Joe Bothel, Cleveland County Master Gardener, will teach you all about it! Free buckets for composting will be given away WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!
Healthy Cooking with Winter Vegetables (Adults) (Registration Required)
Wednesday, February 28, 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Have you thought about some of the different vegetables that are plentiful during the fall and winter months? Join us as we look at a variety of colorful root vegetables and other vegetables that are at their peak during this season. We’ll explore ways to continue to “Eat the Rainbow” and add a few new recipes to keep meals interesting, tasty, and doable. Presented by Nancy Abasiekong, Extension Agent with the Cleveland County Cooperative Extension.
Library Storytime in Person (preschoolers)
Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:30 am -11:30 am
Library Community Room
Come to the library to enjoy a story, music, and a take-home craft with Miss. Anne.
Learn Grow Play
(preschoolers)
Fridays 10:00 am -11:30 am
Library Community Room
Play in centers, then enjoy a story, music, and a take-home craft with Miss. Anne.
Technology Assistance
Make an appointment
704-739-2371
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With grateful hearts, these AKA members remember and honor local and national leaders on Martin Luther King Day. (Photos by Katherine Pendergrass)

MLK Breakfast
a rousing success

The annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. breakfast was held Monday, January 15, at Bynum Chapel AME Zion church. The breakfast was sponsored by The Davidson Association, Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Bynum Chapel AME Zion Church, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., Zeta Mu Omega Chapter, and the City of KM.
This was the second year in which the breakfast highlighted the legacy of Mrs. Ina Hager. Many years ago, the Rev. Stellie J. Jackson, former pastor of Bynum Chapel, had an idea of a breakfast to honor the late Dr. King Jr. This idea was shared with the Christian Education Department in which Mrs. Hager was the Director of Christian Education. Mrs. Hager implemented and continued the breakfast for years until she became ill. Mrs. Hager transitioned from this life in 2022.
In 2023, the Davidson Association asked to partner with Bynum Chapel to continue Mrs. Hager's legacy. The breakfast was held at Mt. Zion that year.
This year, there were over one hundred and fifty people in attendance. Rev. Randy Miller, Davidson Board Chairman, presided, and Rev. Elenor Wilson, pastor of Bynum Chapel, opened with prayer and a welcome. Gale Hunter shared Ina’s Legacy.
Greetings were from Mayor Rob Wagman, Cassie Watkins, President of Zeta Mu Omega, David Hager, son of Mrs. Hager, and Christina Hager Campbell, oldest granddaughter of Mrs. Hager.
La Shonna Bookert performed a Liturgical Dance, and Henry Gilmore III was the vocalist. Guest speaker was Jeff Ross, Strategist, West Market Community Engagement & Corporate Responsibility, Atrium Health. He gave an inspiring and heartfelt speech which he related to Dr. King’s dream. Mr. Ross shared how he overcame poverty, and his childhood dream became a reality in adulthood.
He challenged the audience to dream because those dreams can also become real. Former Mayor Scott Neisler received special recognition and was presented with a gift from The Davidson Association.
Mayor Pro Tem Annie Thombs gave remarks, and Rev. Katherine Pendergrass, president of The Davidson Association, gave Closing Remarks.
The Davidson Association is a non-political, non-profit 501(c)3 organization. Its membership is open to anyone who desires to bring the old Davidson School, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, back to life as a Community Resource Center.
The Davidson Board includes Randy Miller, Chairman; Valerie Boyd, Vice-Chair; Geraldine Dye, Secretary; Melvin White, Treasurer; Tamra Moody, Asst. Treasurer; and Katherine Pendergrass, member. Website: historicdavidson.org; email: historicdavidson@gmail.com.
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Pictured, L-R: President of Cleveland County Democratic Women Joyce Gladstone, Secretary of State Elaine Marshall, and NC Democratic Party Woman of the Year Betsy Wells were honored by the Cleveland County Democratic Party last week. Photos by CCDP

Cleveland County Dems
kick-off the 2024 election year,
two KM members honored

By Loretta Cozart

 On Thursday, January 4, at 5:30 p.m., the Cleveland County Democratic Party hosted “An Evening with Secretary of State Elaine Marshall” at Don Gibson Theater in Shelby, a big kick-off event for the 2024 elections year. Approximately 130 people were in attendance.
Secretary of State Elaine Marshall was the main speaker, and NC Supreme Court Justice Allison Riggs was also present. Two state candidates attended: Pam Genant, candidate for Congressional Ditrict 14, and David Wheeler, candidate for NC Labor Commissioner.
Several other county candidates at the event included Frances Webber, candidate for NC House 111; Justin Matthews, candidate for NC House 110; Angela Woods, candidate for NC District Judge; Coleman Hunt; Rod Powell; Tracy Ross, all candidates for Cleveland Co School Board; and Stormy Mongiello and David Peace, candidates for County Commissioner.
Two local Kings Mountain women, Betsy Wells of the Dixon Community and Joyce Gladstone of Gold Run, were honored during the evening. Betsy Wells was recognized for being named NC Democratic Party Woman of the Year by Secretary Marshall, Cleveland County Party Chair Kent Blevins, fellow Cleveland County Smackdown participant Andy Dedmon, and Cleveland County Democratic Women President Joyce Gladstone. When asked about the honor, Betsy said, “It was a really big night for me.”
Joyce Gladstone, outgoing President of Cleveland County Democratic Women, was also honored. She received a crystal gavel from the incoming Cleveland County Women’s President Michelle Roberts.
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This photo of Central School was taken in 1910, shortly after the rebuilt school was opened. Photo by DigitalNC

Pieces of  Kings Mountain History

By Loretta Cozart

I often say, “What is old can be new again,” which is especially true about many things in Kings Mountain. The community received news last week that Gaston Christian School had purchased Central School and would be opening a campus here soon. It makes sense because they already have campuses in Gastonia and Shelby.
When I read the news, I thought, “Oh, thank you, Jesus! This little sliver of my childhood will not be lost.” I feel confident I am not the only person having that same thought.
A study of Central School gives us a brief history of this property. As far as I can tell, this has always been a place of learning for the youth of Kings Mountain and surrounding counties. Initially, the school had a smaller footprint. Over time, as people moved away from homes adjacent to the school, the school board bought land bounded by Ridge Street, N. Gaston Street, and Parker Street. Only the homes along N. Piedmont were spared.
The following report was taken from NCDOT TIP No. R-2233B, Mitigation for the Construction of the Rutherfordton Bypass, Fearnbach History Services, Inc. / January 2015was.
In 1876, town residents constructed a two-story frame school on the current Ridge Street site of Kings Mountain School – Central High School.
Principal William T. Bell initially headed the private campus, which functioned as Bell School, Kings Mountain Military Academy, and then the Public High School of
the Town of Kings Moun-tain, all subscription institutions, until 1905, when it became a public school under the direction of superintendent S. W. Carwile. That year, Carwile, who received a $29-per-month salary, and his faculty instructed first through eighth-grade students in a building with an assessed value of $1,200.
A 1910 fire destroyed the frame building, which was replaced that year with a two-story, brick, Classical Revival-style school distinguished by a full-height, four-bay entrance portico. The edifice encompassed twelve classrooms, an auditorium, a music room, and an office. In 1920, increased enrollment required the conversion of the second floor auditorium into four classrooms.
At the close of the 1920-1921 school term, Kings Mountain School Principal F. C. Nye reported 126 students registered in eighth through eleventh grades, with daily attendance averaging 108 youth. Sixteen pupils graduated that spring, completing their course of study under the direction of four female teachers.
A rear addition finished in 1924 provided eight classrooms and an auditorium. (This is the same auditorium we know today, although it has seen renovations over the years. Students played basketball on the stage before the gym was built.) Principal J. Y. Irvin and six female teachers instructed 204 students in 1925 when the graduating class numbered twenty-five young men and women. Students occupied eighteen classrooms, six of which housed high school grades. Four students resided on campus. In 1929-1930, principal B. N. Barnes and thirty-five teachers oversaw 201 high school and 1,194 elementary school pupils. Thirty-four students graduated that spring.
The Federal Emergency Relief Administration and the North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration subsidized grounds improvements at a cost of $5,537.25 in the early 1930s. The campus’s 1910 building was destroyed in a fire on November 14, 1932, but contractors completed the renovation of the 1924 annex and the construction of a spacious classroom building the following year. (According to records, the school was rebuilt from a $10,000 insurance policy held by the Kings Mountain School Board. This was reported in the Charlotte Observer the day the school reopened.)
During the 1933-1934 term, principal Claude Grigg and twelve female teachers educated 475 first through seventh-grade pupils enrolled at Kings Mountain School. At that time, the building comprised twenty-eight classrooms, fourteen of which housed elementary grades, as well as offices, a library, an auditorium, and a recently completed gymnasium.
Principal A. H. Patterson’s high school faculty comprised eight teachers in 1934-1935. High school enrollment comprised 352 students, twenty-eight of whom graduated. Works Progress Administration funds subsidized the gymnasium’s construction in 1937 and the lunchroom’s operation. Principal D. M. Bridges, thirteen full-time and three part-time female educators, supervised 579 enrolled elementary school students in 1939-1940.
Bridges and thirteen other teachers instructed 397 high school students, sixty of whom graduated that spring. Extracurricular activities ranged from athletics to band, drama, and glee clubs. Campus improvements that year included music and first aid room construction and furnishing.
Principal J. E. Huneycutt, sixteen female teachers, one male instructor, and four part-time faculty members (three female and one male) oversaw 689 first through eighth-grade students enrolled in 1946. Daily attendance averaged 564 youth.
   The student body included 264 high school pupils educated by Huneycutt, nine female teachers, and three male faculty members in twelve of the school’s thirty classrooms. Extracurricular activities included athletics, band, glee, health, and stamp clubs. Facility improvements ranged from cafeteria painting and updates to acquiring new library tables, chairs, and books.
In May 1950, Central School’s campus was so large that it had two principals. Willie McGill supervised 280 first- through third-grade pupils educated by him and seven female teachers. Rowell Lane oversaw an additional eleven full-time and three part-time female teachers and one part-time male instructor.
Lane’s faculty taught 395 youth enrolled in fourth through eighth grades, where daily attendance averaged 339 students, and ninth through twelfth grades, where 314 of 361 students typically attended classes. The student body participated in after-school activities such as athletics, band, and health and science clubs. Facility improvements in 1950 included exterior trim painting, a new heating system and furnace chimney installed, and a brick bus garage.
In 1954-1955, Lane and sixteen teachers educated 438 high school students, fifty-nine of whom completed their course of study. Facility improvements included the fluorescent light installation throughout the building. During the 1959-1960 term, principal Harry E. Jaynes and twenty-two faculty members oversaw 542 high school students, 111 of whom graduated. Campus updates includ-ed floor refinishing and the installation of a flagpole.
After the high school moved to a newly constructed campus in the fall of 1965, Central School was the district’s junior high school, accommodating seventh and eighth grades systemwide. Ten years later, sixth grade replaced eighth grade, which relocated to the new junior high school on Phifer Road. Central School remained in operation until becoming the Kings Mountain District’s administrative office in 1994.
As I write, renovation has already begun at Central School. Will this facility be like the Central we once knew and loved? I have heard the owners intend to restore the school to its former glory. That would be wonderful, but changes will likely be made to bring this grand dame into the 21st century.
We want the best for this property and the best for the students attending Gaston Christian School - East Cleveland Campus. We want the property preserved and the students who attend there to thrive. What is good for the school is good for the people of Kings Mountain.
I am so relieved that the school will remain what it was designed to be: a school. I am thankful that the building is being preserved. And I am most grateful to God for allowing this to happen. Yes, my prayers have been answered.
But change always brings challenges. The biggest challenge I see for the school is in its new name, Gaston Christian School - East Cleveland Campus. There is no Kings Mountain in that name. That may not work for many, and only time will tell. The folks of Kings Mountain take great pride in our community, and I’m sure not calling this facility Central will be a challenge; old habits are hard to break.
To the new owners, I humbly suggest you change the name to Gaston Christian School – Kings Mountain. Perhaps that will help the people of the best little town in the state to make the transition and embrace change, welcoming this new era with open arms.

 
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New Cleveland County Finance Director Philip Steffen starts his new role on January 29. Photo provided by Cleveland County

Cleveland County appoints
new finance director

Following a national recruitment effort, which included a comprehensive vetting process, Philip Steffen was selected from a highly competitive field of candidates to lead the Finance Department for Cleveland County Government.
Steffen has 17 years of local government finance experience serving the City of Anacortes, Washington. During his tenure with Anacortes, Philip served in progressively responsible roles, culminating in his appointment as Interim Finance Director.
“It is my privilege to welcome Mr. Steffen to the Cleveland County team as our new Finance Director”, said David Cotton, County Manager. “He is an exceptionally well-rounded subject matter expert who has a demonstrated track record of successfully implementing complex financial and budgeting plans.”
Steffen recently led the City of Anacortes through developing and adopting a $109 million annual budget along with a $252 million capital facilities plan, comparable to Cleveland County’s annual budget. He has a Bachelor of Arts with majors in Accounting and Finance and minors in Economics and Business Administration from Western Washington University. Philip will officially start his new role as Finance Director on January 29, 2024.
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LORETTA COZART

Welcome 2024:
The Year of Change

By Loretta Cozart

The holidays have ended, and it's amazing how quickly the joyous time with family and friends goes by. We've entered 2024 with New Year's resolutions and hope for a better year ahead. We wish the same for our family and friends.
The coming year looks bright, but we are facing many new challenges in Kings Mountain. The most important of these challenges is economic growth. Last month, the city council voted to support development at Dixon Ridge, a new planned development near the casino. Downtown development is ongoing, with a plan for a new hotel in the works. Changes are coming our way.
The Greek philosopher Heraclitus said that change is the only constant in life. Only fragments of his writings remain, but paraphrasing he shared, "Everything changes, nothing remains still, and you cannot step twice into the same stream."
There was a time when the citizens of Kings Mountain embraced change and even reveled in it. When the pioneer Capt. Freno Dilling moved to town and began cutting cross ties, he anticipated a coming need he could provide for the railroad. He added a water tower to supply water to the steam locomotives as the ties he sold them were being loaded onto the train. He created a one-stop shop, if you will.
Shortly thereafter, William A. Mauney and his brother Jacob S. Mauney brought their families to town and opened a store. In time, the Mauney family would build several mills in and near Kings Mountain, providing jobs for folks wishing to transition from farm to city lifestyles. The brothers created Cleveland County's first bank, and their children married and added exponentially to the city's economic growth. They incorporated the City of Kings Mountain on February 11, 1874.
Farmers followed them, moving from the country to Kings Mountain, looking for a steady income and a community in which to raise their families. Farming was hard, and people transitioned from agrarian to urban lifestyles.
In the 50s, mill owners began selling many of their mills and mill properties as they saw the writing on the wall for the future of textiles domestically. Because the mills remained in operation, retail in Kings Mountain was spared for about 15 years. But in time, retail in the downtown area was also affected. By the 1990s, NAFTA was implemented, and many local jobs were sent overseas. Mills closed, retail diminished, and downtown fell into disrepair as shops closed and owners lost revenue.
In the last several decades, new residents have relocated to Kings Mountain. They brought new ideas regarding revitalization throughout the city. It is an exciting time to live in Kings Mountain, as property values have risen exponentially after the pandemic.
However, many people are hesitant regarding change. Perhaps they fear that the proposed changes won't be successful. Or they think Kings Mountain is what it is. Nothing more. It is sad to think that decades of economic downturn can negatively shape a community’s perception of itself.
It is important to remember that the town comprises the land, buildings, and physical attributes encompassing everything within its boundaries. These things can be manipulated to suit the needs of the people, but they do not make Kings Mountain what it is. The people, not the land, make the town what it is. What Kings Mountain is and can become is driven by the imaginations of our citizens.
As of the date of this publication, we are five weeks and four days away from our city's sesquicentennial, but nothing has been planned to celebrate the occasion. 150 years have passed since Kings Mountain was incorporated. Sadly, we are not following in the footsteps of those visionary leaders who founded our city and boldly celebrated their accomplishments. Those pioneers celebrated change as an opportunity, a stepping stone to the future, and we should also.
Today, these new pioneers, willing to invest, possess the vision and foresight necessary for Kings Mountain’s success. We must support them and embrace this change as we boldly face the future together.
Why, you ask? Because change is coming, that's for sure. If the community embraces change and revels in it, we can shape the future of Kings Mountain into a city where everyone can work, play, and live. Some may say the time is not right. To them, I have only one question: "If not now, when?"

North School recognized at Clev. Co.
Boys & Girls Clubs holiday party

 

   The Boys & Girls Clubs of Cleveland County held its Annual Children's Holiday Party for all eight of their Club Sites at the Legrand Center. Approximately 250 people attended the event, which included a full Christmas dinner, games, and gift-giving to the children. Two lucky children won brand-new bicycles, while children from the Clubs performed skits and sang songs.
   The North Elementary Ext. Club Site members' performance was exceptional, with the children singing and dancing to a modern version of Jingle Bells and showcasing their skills learned from the Boys & Girls Club's talented staff. They greeted the audience by saying "Merry Christmas" and recited the Boys and Girls Club motto, "Great Futures Start Here," in Japanese, Spanish, and Sign Language. The Unit Director of the North Elementary Ext. Club Site Vinona Muhammed provided amazing club experiences and programs.
   Throughout the evening, awards were given to children and staff for their outstanding achievements for the year. Winners received a gift card and a plaque or certificate. Adelyn Bishop was awarded the Junior Youth of the Year Award for the North Elementary Ext. Club Site for her amazing efforts and kind heart. She always has a great attitude and is willing to lend a helping hand to other students. Adelyn is a true inspiration to all of us at the North Elementary Ext. Club Site. Her dedication to her studies, peers, and community is remarkable. Her kindness and positive attitude are infectious and profoundly impact everyone around her. Congratulations, Ms. Adelyn, on this well-deserved recognition!
   For the Boys & Girls Clubs Staff, Mrs. Bettina Oates from our North Elementary Ext. Club Site was awarded for her "Outstanding Service to Youth." Mrs. Oates goes above and beyond for the members of the Boys & Girls Club after-school program, teaching Spanish to the children regularly. Her dedication to the program and the children is truly remarkable. Mrs. Oates is known for her ability to connect with each child on an individual level, making them feel seen and heard. Through her Spanish lessons, she not only teaches the language but also the importance of cultural awareness and appreciation. The children in the program look up to Mrs. Oates as a role model and mentor, and she has made a significant impact on their lives. Congratulations, Mrs. Oates, on your well-deserved award.
   The holiday season is a special time of the year when we celebrate and share love through thoughtful gestures and gifts. It's a time for giving and spreading kindness to those around us, whether it's volunteering at a shelter, donating to a charity, or spending quality time with loved ones. Let's remember the importance of giving and the true spirit of generosity and selflessness.
   The Boys & Girls Club of Cleveland County runs eight program sites that serve more than 500 children in all four school zones in Cleveland County. Each day, students participate in various activities like homework tutoring, arts and crafts, music, computers, STEM, SMART Moves, Healthy Habits, and Triple Play Sports. These programs are designed to be fun and engaging while providing valuable life skills and character development experiences. Children learn resiliency techniques, strategies to resist risky behaviors, and how to contribute positively to their community and society.
   This year, 89% of our members achieved "B or Better" grades on their report cards. One hundred percent of our members progressed to the next grade level on time and are on track to graduate high school. We delivered over 700 hours of nutrition programming and provided more than 36,000 healthy meals and snacks. Members also received an equal number of hours of physical activity. We delivered 1328 hours of SMART Moves (life skills) training, and students participated in 275 hours of conflict resolution training. We had zero arrests and zero pregnancies among our club members. All our high school seniors graduated on time, with four enrolled in college and one enlisted in the military. Younger teens participated in career/college exploration and learned financial management skills from local universities.
   We are proud of these outstanding results and the students and staff who have achieved them. If you're interested, please consider one of our sponsorship opportunities and help us recognize their accomplishments as we celebrate the joy of the holiday season.

KMPD congratulates officers

Kings Mountain Police Department congratulates Patrol Officer Alex Geissinger and Detective Robert Hoyle for being awarded their General Certification from the NC Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission.
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Sandie Dee (Photo by Betsy Wells)

Sandie Dee honored at 31st
Distinguished Women’s Banquet

The Cleveland County Commission for Women hosted the 31st Annual Distinguished Women’s Banquet on November 2nd at 6:30 p.m. at the LeGrand Center. More than 100 women have been honored with this prestigious award since its inception in 1992. This year’s honorees included Tiffany W. Crank, Kendalyn Lutz-Craver, and Brianna Meagan Delany. In addition, Kings Mountain’s Sandie Dee was slated to be recognized last year but could not attend the event. So, she was honored this year.
Sandie Dee served as an Army Aviation Officer and was the first female helicopter pilot in the US Army to be assigned to a forward-deployed combat aviation unit (2-1 Aviation Brigade, Second Infantry Division, Republic of Korea). Her job was to fly the unarmed scout helicopters (OH-58) in advance of the attack helicopters to identify targets and threats. She also served in the South Carolina National Guard.
Later, Sandie started two businesses in Cleveland County, contributing to the community and local economy. Patriot Jacks Outfitters and Big Reds Café were both founded by our honoree. She is an accomplished grower of flowers and sought out for advice and workshops. While a member, Sandie led the “We Build People” Kings Mountain YMCA campaign, which was focused on the local veteran community securing a $300.000 contribution from the city of Kings Mountain to supplement a state grant for Y improvements.
   Sandie also served on the Kings Mountain Crisis Ministry, Kings Mountain Forward and had a host garden for the 2022 Cleveland County Home and Garden Tour. Sandie is a devoted mother of two young men and wife to Phil. Through these accomplishments, Sandie quietly supports, mentors, and invests in women of all ages.
In 1978, the Cleveland County Board of Commissioners established the county’s Commission for
Women, charging it with identifying and responding to the needs of all citizens of Cleveland County, with the greatest emphasis being on the needs of area women. The Commission for Women was instrumental in establishing the Cleveland County Abuse Prevention Shelter for women in crisis situations. Working in conjunction with NC Equity (now NC Women United), the Commission participates in a Bi-yearly Legislative Agenda where county women are given the opportunity to present their concerns regarding women’s issues. NC Equity compiles results of the Legislative Agenda. (now NC Women United) and forwarded to state legislators.
In 1991, the commission surveyed the status and needs of county women, sharing the results with county officials. Since its origin, the commission has recognized the contributions of county women through special events and workshops held during Women ’s History Month.
   In 1992, the commission decided to host an annual banquet recognizing the accomplishments and contributions of “distinguished” women. The commission decided in 2009 to reactivate the Miss Cleveland County Fair Pageant. The Cleveland County Commission for Women strives to discuss and communicate the needs of county residents regardless of ethnicity or gender. 
Sandie Dee was honored by the Cleveland County Commission for Women as a 2022 Distinguished Woman honoree at the LeGrand Center on November 2.
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Broad River Genealogical Society receives money for a building–

Broad River Genealogical Society receives money for a building– On November 2, the Broad River Genealogical Society received $495,000 during a check presentation for a building by Senator Ted Alexander, Speaker Tim Moore, and Representative Kelly Hastings. (Photo by Broad River Genological Society)
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North Elementary Fun Run Winners

Front L-R: Alex Salgado, 2 Miles, 3rd place male overall; Alyina Salgado, 1st place female, 1st grade. Back: L-R: Aiden Baker, 1/2 mile, 1st place male,  2nd grade;  Judson Frye, 2 miles, 1st place, 3rd grade; PE Teacher, Coach McDaniel;  Alex Lodholtz, 1/2 mile, 1st place male, 4th grade and Addie Bishop, 2 miles, 1st place female overall.

(Photo by Anna Hughes)
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L-R: Presenter Mark McDaniel, student Georgia Howard and Bethware Principal Lee Howell. (photo provided)

Georgia Howard is
outstanding student

This week the KM High School Athletic Department would like to recognize
Georgia Howard, a fourth grader from Bethware Elementary School as their outstanding student.
Georgia demonstrates Bethware’s Positive Behavior in School model of Buccaneer PRIDE. She always shows a Positive attitude, no matter how difficult a task may be. She Respects her peers and school staff. She shows Integrity by always being
honest and taking responsibility for her actions. She exhibits Determination in every task she performs and nevergives up. Georgia keeps her Environment clean and tidy.
Georgia’s favorite subject in school is PE. She enjoys playing board games, Barbies, dancing, cooking and helping out with her two younger brothers, Zayden and Ezekiel.
Georgia is the daughter of Kristopher and Sallie
Howard and the granddaughter of Blake and Pam Goforth and Dave and Kim Garwood.
Congratulations to the young Mountaineer Georgia!
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Bendatra Wilson McDowel

Bendatra Wilson McDowell
named Woman of the Year

The GFWC NC Kings Mountain Woman’s Club has named Bendatra Wilson McDowell as their Woman of the Year.
 Bendatra is a dedicated person, full of ideas that inspire and encourage those around her. She is a Cleveland County native, raised in Waco, and a graduate of Burns High School.
Bendatra is married to Danny McDowell and has three adult children. Her passion for education led her to spend 30-plus years in the profession. During her career, she held many positions in education. And, at her retirement in 2020, she was an EC Com for Cleveland County Schools.
With her tenacity and leadership ability, she has continued to be active in her church and the community. Currently, she is a member of: KMWC, where she serves as vice president; NC DKG, Delta Tau Chapter, serving as treasurer; Cleveland County Arts Council – educational committee; and the Faith C. Webber Scholarship committee.
A person with a servant perspective and a willing spirit, she has volunteered many hours in the community where it is needed. Kings Mountain Woman’s Club is dear to her because its purpose is to promote the civic, cultural, educational, and social betterment of Kings Mountain through volunteer service. 
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Denise Cobb pictured with her husband Pete.

Cobb named Club
Woman  with Heart

By Anne Gamble

Denise Cobb is a passionate person full of energy that is contagious to all those around her. She is a Kings Mountain native, working and raising a family in our hometown. Denise is happily married to her husband, Pete. She has three children and seven grandchildren, not to mention three dogs. She is employed by a senior living facility and has worked in the industry for over 30 years. Denise’s passion to serve comes from her relationship with Christ Jesus. She is an active member of Pleasant City Church.
She thoroughly enjoys serving as a member of the Kings Mountain Woman’s Club, helping to organize, lead, and invite other women to join her in serving our community. You’ll need to move quickly to keep up with Denise, as she is the one behind the scenes scurrying around to make things happen. Denise sees it as an honor to participate in fundraising and bring awareness to the needs of our community. Denise’s efforts do not go unseen.
Congratulations to Denise Cobb, the GFWC NC Kings Mountain Woman’s Club, Club Woman with Heart award winner. Denise, thank you for your willingness and dedication!
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Patrick Senior Center November events

The Patrick Center is a SHIIP site and can help with Medicare questions and check to see if you qualify for Extra Help with your drug costs. We can also assist with transportation, loan equipment, incontinence supplies, nutritional supplements, and other services.
Please call the center at 704-734-0447 for more information or to sign up for programs. Programs are open to people ages 55 and up unless otherwise noted.
November 2023 Special Events:
Caregiver Appreciation Event: Monday, November 6, 12-2  p.m. Fulltime/primary caregivers are invited for lunch and special pampering. Call the center to RSVP.
Visual Impairment – Another Perspective by Dale Lieser: Tuesday, November 7, 9-10 a.m.
Women’s Health Series: Monday, November 7, 12-1 p.m. Join us to learn about health topics for older women.
We Honor Veterans Breakfast: Thursday, November 9, 9-11 a.m. All veterans are invited to attend. Seating is limited. You must RSVP by calling the center.
Holiday Gift Shop Sale: Tuesday, November 14 – Monday, November 20, 9:30 a.m.-12:30  p.m. Come shopping for your holiday gifts at a discounted price!
Red Cross Blood Drive: Tuesday, November 28, 10 a.m.-2:30  p.m. Call Karen at the center to make an appointment.
Memory Bear Workshop: Wednesday, November 29, 9 a.m.-12  p.m. Sign up to make a stuffed bear or pillow with an article of clothing from a loved one. Call for more info and to RSVP.
Medicare Part D Open Enrollment begins October 15 and goes through December 7. If you want to review your Medicare Drug Plan or Advantage Plan, please call or come by the center beginning October 2 to complete the required form and make an appointment.
Ongoing Activities at the Patrick Center
Ceramics: Mondays, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Facebook Chat: Mondays, 10-10:45 a.m. (Online via Facebook) (No chat on Nov. 13).
Technology by Trey: 2nd Mondays, 10-11 a.m. No class in November.
Seniors in Motion: Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays, 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Suggested donation of $1 per class for non-YMCA members.
Quilting: Mondays, 12:30-3  p.m.
Beginner Quilting: Thursdays, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-3  p.m.
Intermediate Line Dance (Dance Floor Rockers): Mondays, 1-3  p.m.
Intermediate Line Dance (Southern Class): Thursdays, 10-11:30 a.m.
Beginner Line Dancing: Mondays, 11:30-12:30  p.m.
Clogging: Mondays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. & Thursdays, 12:30-1:30  p.m.
Knitting: Tuesdays, 8:30-10:30 a.m.
Veterans Meeting: 1st Tuesdays, 9-10 a.m.
Bible History: Tuesdays, 10-11 a.m.
Monthly Birthday Celebration: 4th Tuesdays, 10-11 a.m.
REFIT Dance Exercise: Tuesdays, 11a.m-12  p.m.
Basic Sewing Class: Tuesdays, 11 a.m.-2  p.m.
Volunteer Meeting: 3rd Tuesdays, 12:15-1  p.m.
Chair Volleyball: Tuesdays, 1-3 p.m. and Fridays, 12-2  p.m.
Canasta: Tuesdays, 1-3  p.m.
Tai Chi for Arthritis: Wednesdays, 9-10 a.m.
Jewelry Class: Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m.
Chair Yoga: Wednesdays, 11:45-12:45  p.m. ($3 Fee).
Dutch Lunch Bunch: 2nd Wednesdays. November 8 – Dino’s Italian Pizzeria in Bessemer City. Please sign up at the Front Desk and pay $2 bus fee.
Blood Pressure Check: 1st Wednesdays, 10-11:30 a.m.
Dulcimer Class: 4th Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m.
Food Giveaway: 3rd Wednesdays, 1-2:30  p.m. Please call to sign up each month.
Online Book Club: 4th Wednesdays, 4 p.m. via Zoom. Please call Mauney Memorial Library to join.
Healthy Lifestyles Class: Thursdays, 8-9:30 a.m.
Gentle Exercise: Thursdays, 9:30-10:15 a.m.
Bingo: Thursdays, 10:30-11:15 a.m.
Bridge: 2nd and 4th Thursdays, 1-4  p.m.
Coffee & Conversation: Fridays, 8:30-10 a.m.
Dulcimer Jam: Fridays, 9-10 a.m.
Chorus: Fridays, 10-11 a.m.
Friday Lunch: Fridays, 11 a.m. -12  p.m. Call to sign up by Thursday at Noon. Cost is $4.
WII Bowling League: Fridays, 12-1  p.m.
Ping Pong/Corn Hole: Fridays, 12-2  p.m.
Shred Truck: The Truck will be here November 8 to shred onsite, but you can bring your items to be shredded at any time the center is open and put them in the locked bins in the lobby.
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November Library news

By  Mari Slaughter

Mauney Memorial Library has the following events scheduled for September. The library is at 100 S. Piedmont Avenue, Kings Mountain, NC 28086. For the latest in library news and events, visit www.mauneylibrary.org.
The library will be closed in observance of Thanksgiving, Thursday through Saturday,  November 23 – Saturday, November 25.
Holiday Aprons with Linda Carpenter (Adult) (Registration Required)
Wednesday, November 1st, 10:00 a.m.-Noon, Library Community Room. Learn to sew a holiday apron with Linda Carpenter. All supplies will be provided.
Library Storytime in Person (preschoolers)
Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:30-11:30  a.m., Library Community Room . Come to the library to enjoy a story, music, and a take-home craft with Miss. Anne.
Learn Grow Play
(preschoolers)
Fridays 10:00-11:30  a.m., Library Community Room. Play in centers, then enjoy a story, music, and a take-home craft with Miss. Anne.
Election
Tuesday, November 7th 6:30  a.m. – 7:30  p.m. , Library Community Roo,. See your voter’s registration for your location.
Ikebana Demonstration (Adult) (Registration
Required)
Wednesday, November 8th 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Library Community Room. Please join Mauney Memorial Library to welcome Emiko Suzuki for an Ikebana demonstration, and to learn more about its rich history!
Emiko Suzuki is a Senior Professor 2nd Grade of Ikenobo School of Ikenobo Ikebana and has Bonten certificate of Omote-Senke, the tea ceremony school both headquartered in Kyoto, Japan. She taught ikebana and the tea ceremony to students of all ages in Japan before she came to Western North Carolina in August 2007. She began studying the tea ceremony and Ikenobo ikebana in 1986 Japan. Emiko graduated from Western North Carolina University with a Masters of Art Teacher in May 2011 and with Master of Fine Art in December 2014. She always tries to bring the Japanese cultural spirit to local organizations through ikebana, tea ceremony and other aspects of Japanese culture. She continues to teach Ikenobo ikebana lessons and tea ceremony. Emiko is a president of Blue Ridge Chapter of Ikenobo Ikebana Society since 2018.
Closed in Observance of Veterans Day
Saturday, November 11th – Monday, November 13th
Afternoon Adventure – Field Trip (ages 6-12)
Monday, November 15th 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Join Mauney Memorial Library at the Gaston County Museum for a tour.
Lego Club (ages 6-12)
Third Thursday of every month, 3:30-4:30  p.m., Library Community Room. Free build and participate in group projects; snacks provided.
3D Printed Cookie
Cutters (Adult)
(Registration Required)
Friday, November 17th 3:30 – 4:30  p.m., Library Community Room. Learn to design your own unique cookie cutter and have it printed in 3D!
Nature Walk with a Ranger (Family)
(Please register only once per family)
Saturday, November 18th 10:00 a.m. – Noon. Take a hike around Crowders Mountain’s Shorts Lake with a Ranger! Learn to identify some of the plants and animals found along the trail and enjoy a morning in the fresh fall air.
This program will meet at Shorts Lake, at Crowders Mountain State Park, 522 Park Office Lane, Kings Mountain (Sparrow Springs access). Turn left at the 4-way stop upon entering the park, which is the lake parking lot.
Book Club:
“Demon Copperhead”
by Barbara Kingsolver
Join the Mauney Library book club and meet with people every month to discuss popular books.
This month’s book is Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver.
Contact info@mauneylibrary.org to join!
Diamond Painting for Adults (Registration
Required) (Family)
Tuesday, November 21st   2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Library Community Room
Join us for coffee while diamond painting! Diamond painting is similar to paint-by-number, but using small sequins to complete the image. New to diamond painting and don’t know how to start? Request a beginner kit and join the fun right away! (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST) We invite experienced diamond painters to bring your works in progress and share your tips and tricks!
Zoom’N On-Line Book Group (Adults)
(Registration Required)
Read. Relish. Recap. Read a book of your choice and share it with the group.
Fourth Wednesday of every month, 4:00-5:00  p.m.
Paper “Take Out” Gift Boxes (Adult)
Wednesday, November 29th, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Make your own “take-out” gift box to wrap up that special gift - to go! All materials provided.
Technology Assistance
Make an appointment at 704-739-2371.
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Pictured left to right: Principal, Kimberley Kepner; teacher, Jennifer Osborne; student, Deylan Evans and Presenter Mark McDaniel.

Dylan Evans named
Outstanding Student

This weeks Kings Mountain High School Athletic’s Department has named fourth grader Dylan Evans from East Elementary as their Outstanding Student.
Dylan is a hard-working student. He always does his best work and is focused on any task he has. When Dylan completes his work, he gets out a book to read or practices his math facts,  while others are finishing their work. He works well with others and completes homework on time.
Dylan enjoys playing football for KM Elite as their kicker and is a captain for the team.
Dylan is a great leader, who will continue being successful by his determination to do his best.
Dylan lives with his mother and step-dad, Lindsay and Jimmie Bell.
Congratulations to East Elementary School’s young Mountaineer!
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Eight KMFD Firefighters
Completed Special Training

Kings Mountain Fire Department has committed to providing the best training available to our firefighters. They now have eight North Carolina Breathing Equipment and Firefighter Survival School graduates. Two firefighters are sent to every school to receive the best training available as they serve Kings Mountain. Pictured with KMPD’s specially trained firefighters are Assistant Fire Chief Josh Wall and Fire Chief Tommy Harmon (right) in white shirts. With them are Capt. Jamie Black, Noah Allen, Mike Kennedy, Levi Keever, Holden Harrelson, Lt. Ross Clark, and Lt. Trevor Mashburn. Not pictured: Chris Cook.     
(Photo by KMFD)

 

KM Little Theatre, Inc.
presents "An Enchanted
Bookshop Christmas"

Kings Mountain Little Theatre, Inc. presents "An Enchanted Bookshop Christmas" directed by Amy Hardin.
Performances are at the Joy Theatre, 202 S. Railroad Avenue, Kings Mtn. on November 3, 4, 10, & 11 at 7:30 PM and Sundays, November 5 & 12 at 3:00 PM
All tickets are $10. Online Ticket Sales www.kmlt.org will start Monday October 16 at 8AM!!Reservations: 704-730-9408 tickets@kmlt.org
Miss Margie, the scatterbrained owner of the shop, has two very special guests her sister Ellen and book-loving niece Annabelle. Ellen was recently laid off, however, when high-tech billionaire Philip Brantley stops in at the shop and Margie convinces him to hire Ellen for his new space project. Margie has a brainstorm to wrap the bookmark that Philip wrote his phone number on and give it to Ellen as a Christmas present. After all, what could possibly go wrong? Ha! When the present disappears, it's up to our come-to-life book characters to solve the mystery of the missing bookmark and save the day for Ellen - all without giving away their magical existence. It's a hilarious, heartwarming tale that reminds us that the best gifts don't come wrapped in pretty paper and bows.
Kings Mountain Little Theatre, Inc. is a volunteer based, 501c3 tax-exempt community theater. It owns and operates the Joy Performance Center and the Liberty Mountain Garden. It is a funded affiliate of the Cleveland County Arts Council and is supported in part by a Grassroots Grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a state agency.
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Becca Irvin Pottery will be available at Carolina Pottery Festival on Nov. 4, at the LeGrand Center in Shelby. Photo by Cleveland County Arts Council

Carolina Pottery Festival returns Nov. 4 to the
LeGrand Center

The Carolina Pottery Festival returns for its 22nd year on Saturday, November 4, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the LeGrand Center, 1800 E. Marion St. in Shelby, NC. This pottery festival attracts crowds of over 2000 pottery lovers, with over 100 well-known regional potters showing and selling their work. It is one of the largest “pottery only” festivals in the southeast, with a wide range of traditional and contemporary work that is functional, decorative, and sculptural. Artists are on hand to talk about their inspiration, methods of creation and to answer any questions.
This festival was started by potters, for potters, and continues to celebrate and honor the rich heritage of pottery in our region. “This is an excellent way to see so many different styles of pottery all under one roof,” stated Bobbi Black, one of the festival founders. “Our goal has always been to showcase a wide variety of pottery and to allow customers to meet the potters while they shop.”
The pottery festival is coordinated by the Cleveland County Arts Council. “We are thrilled to be back this year with many returning potters as well as potters who are new to our festival,” commented Shearra Miller, Executive Director of the Arts Council.
Attendees can register for a chance to win a $30 gift certificate that can be used during the festival at any vendor’s booth.
Parking is convenient and free.  Admission is $6.00 for those ages 13 and over. Tickets may be purchased in advance online at http://www.ccartscouncil.org/Events.htm.
For more information, contact the Cleveland County Arts Council at 704-484-2787 or visit http://www.ccartscouncil.org/Events.htm or https://www.facebook.com/CarolinaPotteryFestival.
Participating potters include Art in Clay, Bairs Den Pottery, Banfield Pottery, Becca Irvin Pottery, Ben B. Pottery, Bh Black Pottery, Black Pug Pottery, Blue Heaven Arts & Enterprises, Bluegill Pottery, Caveman Pottery, Celtic Pottery, Ceramic Sorcery, Cox Fine Arts, Creative Clay, Diehl's Pottery, Dirty Jeans Pottery, Ed Lane Pottery and Design, Eric Holder Pottery, Everyday Earthenware, Faded Earth Pottery, Foo's Pottery, Four Paw Pottery, Gerard Pottery, Glazed Expressions, Green Thumb Pottery, Hannah Cupp Pottery, Happy Toad Pottery, Hog Hill Pottery, Robert and Marti Hovis, Imperfect Tense Pottery, Jodi Lynn Pottery, Joe's Lake Pottery, Jordan Mill Pottery, Jordan Mill Pottery, Keith Martindale Pottery, Kim Haig Pottery, Kovack Pottery, Lakeside Ceramics, Latin Lotus Pottery, Living Pots by Frog Prince, Lonon Pottery, Lucinda Handmade Pottery, Mud Pie Pottery, Mud Slinger Pottery, Noble Hound Pottery, Old Julian Pottery, Pam Bailey Pottery, Paul Haigh Pottery, Paul Ray Pottery, PCH Pottery, Peaceful Path Pottery, Pots by A1 bear, Pottery by Beth, Pottery by Remo, R Strom Pottery, Rachel W Ceramics, Raine Middleton Pottery Randy Tobias Ravenswood Pottery Ravenswood Pottery Recenter Ceramics Red Feather Pottery, Richard Wright Pottery, John "Mac" Robinson, Shorty and Me Pottery, Skunk Hollow Pottery, Spinning Out Pottery Studio, Stretching Clay LLC, Susan Jones Pottery, Talking Mud Pottery, The Laughing Potter, The Mountains & The Sea, The Porch Potters Tigersmoon Design, Tim Whitten Pottery, Toss and Turn Pottery, Turning Point Clay Studio, Tyro Pottery & Creations, Vicki Halloran Pottery, Walker-Mourglea Pottery, Whitesides Studio, Wild Child Clayworks, and William Morgan Pottery.
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Preschool children of all ages enjoyed the visit by CCSO for Career Week.

Clev. County Sheriff’s office visits Resurrection Lutheran
Preschool for career week

By Loretta Cozart

Cleveland County Sheriff's Office’s Deputy Staton, K9 Joker, and others from Baker Squad enjoyed spending time at Resurrection Lutheran Preschool last week for Career Week!
They shared regarding the event, “We had a blast, and we think the children did, too!”

KM Baptist hosts FREE Fall Festival

Kings Mountain Baptist Church announces its Fall Festival on Tuesday, October 31, from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m., weather permitting, at 101 West Mountain Street in Kings Mountain. Best of all, everything at the festival is free, so you can enjoy all the fun activities without spending a dime.
The Fall Festival is a fun and exciting event perfect for families. Hosted by the Kings Mountain Baptist Church, this festival offers an array of activities everyone can enjoy. Whether you're a fan of bouncy houses, hot dogs, games, or candy, you'll find something to love at this festival.
One of the highlights of the festival is the costume contest. This is a great opportunity to show off your creativity and create a unique and fun costume. There will also be plenty of other activities to participate in, including crafts and games. And, of course, there will be plenty of candy to go around.
The festival will occur at the Kings Mountain Baptist Church, 101 West Mountain Street in Kings Mountain, NC. It will run from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. Best of all, everything at the festival is free, so you can enjoy all the fun activities without spending a dime. Don't miss out on this completely FREE and exciting event that includes a Bouncy House (weather permitting), Hot dogs, Games, Costume contest, Crafts, and lots of Candy!
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Lynn Slycord, center, and the PSAP team with Chief Childress, right. (Photo by Susan Mosk)

KMPD PSAP commended for zero deficiencies after a state review

By Loretta Cozart

During the October city council work session, Chief Gerald Childress praised Lynn Slycord, the Communications Manager of Kings Mountain Police Department’s PSAP, along with her team for achieving a zero-deficiency rating on the state review conducted in August last year. Only four PSAPs achieved this across North Carolina.
PSAPs, also known as Public Safety Answering Points or 911 Call Centers, are responsible for answering emergency calls and dispatching emergency services. Kings Mountain’s PSAP, located at 112 S. Piedmont Avenue, not only serves the city but also handles after-hours calls and can act as a backup for other emergency services within the county. 
Chief Childress shared a letter from the NC Executive Director 911 Board L.V. Pokey Harris, who wrote, “Pursuant to Rule 09 NCAC 06C .0216, the Board conducted the annual review of your PSAP on August 2, 2023, to assess its operations. The assessment revealed no deficiencies; therefore, pursuant to Rule .0216(d), the PSAP will not be subject to another review for three years, making your next assessment due in 2026. Your PSAP will be notified 90 days prior to the next review.
“The assessment team was very impressed with your assessment binder. It was clear you had spent a good amount of time preparing it in advance of our visit, which allowed for one of the most expedient assessments we have conducted. The assessment team also noted that your binder could serve as a model for other PSAPs to follow when putting their own binder together. With that in mind, thank you for bringing your binder to the recent PSAP Managers Meeting. Having it there for others to see and review will undoubtedly help them going forward.
   “Congratulations, Lynn, on successfully completing your assessment with zero deficiencies, and thank you for working so collaboratively with us through this process.”

 
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It’s time to get your pumpkins!

 Boyce Memorial ARP Church, located at 111 Edgemont Drive in Kings Mountain annual pumpkin patch is open again this year. Pumpkins are ready for pickup. Hours are: Monday to Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.  and closed on Sundays.  Pumpkins are great for fall decorating, or a variety of recipes that  popular this time of year. For more information, look on Facebook for KM Pumpkins.

(Photos by Melvin Ware)
 

Wells Honored

Betsy Wells was honored with the Woman of the Year Award from NC Democratic Women during the DWNC in Charlotte in September.

Photos provided
 
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Library October news

Mauney Memorial Library has the following events scheduled for September. The library is at 100 S. Piedmont Avenue, Kings Mountain, NC 28086. For the latest in library news and events, visit www.mauneylibrary.org.
Orchid Conservatory Tour (Adult)
(Registration Required)
Wednesday, October 4th 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden, 6500 S. New Hope Rd., Belmont NC.
Take a guided tour of the Orchid Conservatory at Daniel Stowe Botanical Gardens! This giant glass-house is dedicated to orchids and includes a waterfall and many other exotic plants. After the tour, feel free to explore the rest of the gardens on your own. Participants must provide their own transportation.
Fish On! (Family)
(Registration Required—please register only once per family)
Ages 16 and older need a valid freshwater NC Fishing License to fish. Please remember to purchase you fishing license before June 9th.
Saturday, October 7th 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Meet at Shorts Lake, in Crowders Mountain State Park, 522 Park Office Lane, Kings Mountain (Sparrow Springs access). Turn left at the 4-way stop upon entering the park, which is the lake parking lot.
Join us to wet a hook with a State Park Ranger! Give fishing a try and learn why it is such a rewarding outdoor activity. Outdoor lovers of all ages are welcome. Fishing tackle, poles, and bait will be provided.
Library Storytime in
Person (preschoolers)
Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Library Community Room
Come to the library to enjoy a story, music, and a take-home craft with Miss. Anne.
Learn Grow Play
 (preschoolers)
Fridays 10:00-11:30 a.m.
Library Community Room
Play in centers, then enjoy a story, music, and a take-home craft with Miss. Anne.
Author Talk: L. Diane Wolfe (Adult)
 (Registration Required)
Tuesday, October 10th 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Library Community Room
Learn about the inner workings of the publishing industry from author and publisher L. Diane Wolfe as she joins us to speak about book publishing, marketing, and her titles.
L. Diane Wolfe is the owner and senior editor of Dancing Lemur Press LLC, a speaker, and the author known as “Spunk on a Stick,” Wolfe is a member of the National Speakers Association. She conducts seminars on book publishing, promoting, leadership, and goal-setting and offers book formatting and author consultation. Wolfe contributes to the Insecure Writer’s Support Group.
Afternoon Adventure – Field Trip (ages 6-12)
Monday, October 16th 11:00 a.m.-Noon
Join Mauney Memorial Library at the Kings Mountain State Park for a history tour.
Lego Club (ages 6-12)
Third Thursday of every month 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Library Community Room
Free build and participate in group projects, snacks provided.
Prostate Cancer Awareness (Registration Required) (Adult)
Monday, October 23rd 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Library Community Room
Levine Cancer Institute will be providing a free education class on Prostate Cancer. Prostate Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in men. When detected early, the survival rate for men is high. Screenings include blood tests for glucose, lipids, PSA, and testosterone levels.
Men at higher risk include Men with family history, African American men aged 40 to 70 years old, and Men with high-risk jobs, including veterans, firefighters, and farmers.
Free grocery cards will be handed out at the event!
Carolina Haints: Ghosts, Folklore, and History of the Old North State
(Registration Required) (Family)
Wednesday, October 25th 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Join us to hear chilling and thrilling stories of NC legends and folklore! Carolina Haints’ Dan Sellers will be here reading from their book, “Carolina Haints: Ghosts, Folklore and Mysteries of the Old North State.”
Carolina Haints is a non-profit organization devoted to promoting folklore and storytelling in the Carolinas.
Technology Assistance
Make an appointment
704-739-2371
Zoom’N On-Line Book Group (Adults) (Registration Required)
Read. Relish. Recap. Read a book of your choice and share it with the group.
Fourth Wednesday of every month 4:00-5:00 p.m.
For the latest in library news and events, visit www.mauneylibrary.org. Please follow us on Facebook and Instagram.
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Patrick Sr. Center October events

The Patrick Center is a SHIIP site and can help with Medicare questions and check to see if you qualify for Extra Help with your drug costs. We can also assist with transportation, loan equipment, incontinence supplies, nutritional supplements, and other services.
Please call the center at 704-734-0447 for more information or to sign up for programs. Programs are open to people ages 55 and up unless otherwise noted.
October 2023
Special Events:
• Women’s Health Series: Tuesday, October 3, 12-1 p.m. Join us to learn about different, sensitive health topics for older women. Call the Center to sign up.
• Senior Day at the Fair: Tuesday, October 3, 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Cost: $2 bus fee.
• Crafts with Claudia: Tuesday, October 3, 1-3 p.m. Cost is $2. Please call to sign up.
• Pool Tournament (Sponsored by Visiting Angels and Brookdale Shelby): Friday, October 13, 10 a.m.-Until. Sign up in the Pool Room.
• Mediterranean South Program.: Wednesdays, October 4 – November 1, 10-10:45 a.m. Free classes of Southern eating with a Mediterranean twist. Please call the center to sign up.
• Flower Arranging Class: Tuesday, October 10, 12-2 p.m. Make a beautiful fall arrangement. Cost is $5. Sign up and pay fee at the Front Desk.
• Creative Arts, Crafts and Quilting Expo: Tuesday, October 17, 12-3 p.m. Come see all our amazing talent at the center!
• Wreath Making Class: Tuesday, October 17, 1-2 p.m. Cost is $4. Please sign up and pay the fee at the Front Desk.
• “Laughter is the Best Medicine” Presentation: Thursday, October 19, 10-10:30 a.m. Come learn about the physical and emotional benefits of a good laugh.
• Paint Class with Kathy: Thursday, October 19, 5:30-8 p.m. Open to ages 16 and up. All supplies are provided. The cost is $20. Please sign up and pay the fee at the Front Desk.
• Butterbean Auction: Wednesday, October 25, 10-11 a.m. Come win cool stuff!
• Chat with the Chief: Friday, October 27, 9-10 a.m. Meet KM Police Chief Gerald Childress.
• Reappraisal Project Presentation: Monday, October 30, 10-11 a.m. Come to learn how a reappraisal is conducted for your real estate.
• Special Halloween Facebook Chat: Tuesday, October 31, 10 a.m. (Online via Facebook Live)
• Art Gallery Open House: Tuesday, October 31, 1-3 p.m.  Join us in the Craft Room on Halloween to meet our talented artists and view their works of art.
• Medicare Part D Open Enrollment begins October 15 and goes through December 7. If you want to review your Medicare Drug Plan or Advantage Plan, please call or come by the center beginning October 2 to complete the required form and make an appointment.
Ongoing Activities at the Patrick Center
• Ceramics: Mondays, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
• Facebook Chat: Mondays, 10-10:45 a.m. (Online via Facebook) No FB chat on 10/16 or 10/30).
Technology by Trey: 2nd Mondays, 10-11 a.m. October 9 – Topic: Customizing your phone.
• Seniors in Motion: Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays, 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Suggested donation of $1 per class for non-YMCA members.
• Quilting: Mondays, 12:30-3 p.m.
• Beginner Quilting: Thursdays, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-3 p.m.
• Intermediate Line Dance (Dance Floor Rockers): Mondays, 1-3 p.m.
• Intermediate Line Dance (Southern Class): Thursdays, 10-11:30 a.m.
• Beginner Line Dancing: Mondays, 11:30-12:30 p.m.
• Clogging: Mondays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. & Thursdays, 12:30-1:30 p.m.
• Knitting: Tuesdays, 8:30-10:30 a.m.
• Veterans Meeting: 1st Tuesdays, 9-10 a.m.
• Bible History: Tuesdays, 10-11 a.m.
• Monthly Birthday Celebration: 4th Tuesdays, 10-11 a.m.
• REFIT Dance Exercise: Tuesdays, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
• Basic Sewing Class: Tuesdays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
• Volunteer Meeting: 3rd Tuesdays, 12:15-1 p.m.
• Chair Volleyball: Tuesdays, 1-3 p.m. and Fridays, 12-2 p.m.
• Canasta: Tuesdays, 1-3 p.m.
• Tai Chi for Arthritis: Wednesdays, 9-10 a.m. (No Class 10/4).
• Jewelry Class: Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m.
• Chair Yoga: Wednesdays, 11:45-12:45 p.m. ($3 Fee).
• Dutch Lunch Bunch: 2nd Wednesdays. October 11 – Pita Wheel & Tony’s Ice Cre a.m. in Gastonia. Please sign up at the Front Desk and pay $2 bus fee.
• Blood Pressure Check: 1st Wednesdays, 10-11:30 a.m.
• Dulcimer Class: 4th Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m.
• Food Giveaway: 3rd Wednesdays, 1-2:30 p.m. Please call to sign up each month.
• Online Book Club: 4th Wednesdays, 4 p.m. via Zoom. Please call Mauney Memorial Library to join.
• Healthy Lifestyles Class: Thursdays, 8-9:30 a.m.
• Gentle Exercise: Thursdays, 9:30-10:15 a.m.
• Bingo: Thursdays, 10:30-11:15 a.m.
• Bridge: 2nd and 4th Thursdays, 1-4 p.m.
• Coffee & Conversation: Fridays, 8:30-10 a.m.
• Dulcimer J a.m.: Fridays, 9-10 a.m.
• Chorus: Fridays, 10-11 a.m.
• Friday Lunch: Fridays, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Call to sign up by Thursday at Noon. Cost is $4.
• WII Bowling League: Fridays, 12-1 p.m.
• Ping Pong/Corn Hole: Fridays, 12-2 p.m.
• Shred Truck: Truck will be here on October 11 to shred onsite, but you can bring your items to be shredded at any time the center is open and put them in the locked bins in the lobby.

Woman’s Club honors
KMPD and KMFD

GFWC NC Kings Mountain Woman's Club members delivered treats to the KMPD and KMFD in honor of their dedicated service to our community.  The Civic Engagement and Outreach Community Service Program sponsors this annual project.  Jodi Adams pictured with Kings Mountain Fire Department.

Pictured Right: L-R: Linda Appling, KMPD Sgt. Alexander, and Anne
Gamble. (Photos by GFWC NC Kings Mountain Woman’s Club)
 
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Battle of Kings Mountain
Commemoration Oct. 7-8

Mark your calendar now for the 243rd anniversary of the Battle of Kings Mountain on
Saturday, October 7 & 8, at Kings Mountain National Military Park, 2625 Road, Blacksburg, SC.
   Parking will be offsite at Kings Mountain State Park. Please follow the signs to the parking area. To make reservations for events noted below, call 863-936-7921 extension 3.
Events include:
October 7: 243rd Battle Anniversary 
• 9 a.m. – Patriot Advance, Guided Hike (reservations required)
• 11 a.m. - Wreath Laying Ceremony at US Monument
• 1 p.m. - Guest Speaker, Dr. Eddie Lee, Professor of History at Winthrop University
• 3 p.m. - Arrival of Overmountain Victory Trail Marchers
The Patriot Advance – Guided Hike allows participants to experience the lead-up to the battle of Kings Mountain on foot, in the woods, as they approach the historic battlefield. This will be a special 2.3 mile hike and is limited to 10 participants and reservations are required. Hikers will traverse rough and steep terrain, mostly uphill on unpaved trails. The hike is expected to take two hours or less.
Reserved participants will meet at the offsite parking at Kings Mountain State Park, follow signs, at 08:30 a.m., and be transported via shuttle to the start point. The hike will end at the Kings Mountain National Military Park Visitor Center. Participants are welcome to attend the other functions at the park once the hike is complete. Shuttle service back to the parking area will be provided.
Participants are expected to be self-supporting on the trail for two hours and follow all ‘Leave No Trace’ guidelines. There are no developed stops or services available or provided. Just as it was back then.
Guest Speaker Dr. Eddie Lee is a 39-year veteran of the university classroom. He is the former president of the South Carolina Historical Association.  Dr. Lee chairs the Review Board for the National Register of Historic Places, ‘’  The topic of his speech is: ’Kings Mountain and Camden: Remembering the Dead.
Kings Mountain National Military Park preserves and commemorates the site of the October 7, 1780, Revolutionary War battle that turned the tide of the war.
Evening, Saturday,
October 7th
• Guided lantern tours of the battlefield. Take a guided night walk around the battlefield. Reenactors will depict scenes from the night after the battle using accounts from battle participants. Reservations are required.
   October 7th and 8th
• Living History encampment, weapons demonstrations, children’s activities, and more.
• For more information, stop inside the visitor’s center, call 863-936-7921 x 3, or visit nps.gov/kimo
   The 1.5-mile self-guiding walking trail allows visitors to see both battlefield perspectives. It starts by winding below the northern slope of the ridge, where a portion of the Patriot forces assaulted the ridge top. The trail then turns back and runs along the ridge where the Loyalists’ forces surrendered. Wayside exhibits around the trail highlight battle events. The Centennial Monument, U.S. Monument, and Ferguson’s Grave are key features along the trail.
   The trail is for foot travel only, except for motorized wheelchairs. Although the trail is paved, it is steep in places. Benches are located along the trail.
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Poppie Field watercolor by Emma Kay Lewis

“Gateway to Nature” 2023

By Jewel Reavis

“Gateway to Nature” art competition and exhibition opened this past week at Southern Arts Society in Kings Mountain. “Gateway to Nature” is an art exhibition and competition sponsored by Southern Arts Society that aims to explore the relationship between humans and nature. Artists were asked to create work that celebrates, references, or challenges our relationship with the natural world. There is a wide variety of media featured in the show - painting (oil, watercolor, acrylic, pastel), photography, and mixed media. Artists from around the region entered 62 pieces of work for this year’s exhibit. Entries reflect upon the natural beauty surrounding us, as interpreted by the individual artists. You will recognize places, birds, animals, and insects, often caught in a glimpse, that are put down on canvas or captured in a photograph. These fleeting moments are now recorded to enjoy and study for posterity.
Judging the art for this year’s competition is Mark Hamilton, Professor of Fine Arts and Interim Chair, Department of Fine Arts at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, South Carolina. Before coming to Winthrop, Mark worked as a photographer in New York, Milan, and Tokyo and worked with Anne Klein,  Donna  Karan,  Liz
Claiborne, Cynthia Rowley, Malcom Forbes, Frank Stella, Ralph Lauren, Michael Graves, Carolina Herrera, Norma Kamali, among others. Mark's photography has appeared in over 50 international publications including: American Health Magazine, Amica Magazine, Annabella Magazine, Apparel News, Area-Zinc Art Magazine, Art Papers, Beauty Digest, Charlotte Observer, Commercial Photography, Cosmopolitan, Family Circle Magazine, First Magazine, Glamour Magazine, GQ Magazine, Interview, M Magazine, McCalls Magazine, Muse & Spirit, New Woman, NY Times, Parents Magazine, PHOTO, Redbook Magazine, SHE, Shots Magazine, The Herald, Working Mother, Working Woman Magazine, W Magazine, Womans Wear Daily, and Zoom Magazine. Mark currently pursues personal fine arts projects, collaborative projects (www.jenniferandmarkhamilton.com) with photographer Jennifer Hamilton, along with commercial projects for select clientele.
   Mr. Hamilton selected first, second, and third place prizes along with three merit awards from the competition entries. Awards will be presented at a reception this coming Saturday September 30, from 6-8pm. Winners will be announced at 7 pm. Many of the artists will be in attendance to meet visitors and discuss their work. The public is invited to attend. This is a free event. Dress is casual. Work in the exhibit is available for sale.
     “Gateway to Nature” will be on display in the galleries of Southern Arts Society through November 3, 2023. Work in the exhibit can also be seen on the website and Facebook page of Southern Arts Society.
   Southern Arts Society (SASi) Gift Shop & Gallery is located at 301 N. Piedmont Avenue in the historic Southern Railway Depot, at the intersection of Piedmont and Battleground. SASi offers a gift shop, ongoing exhibits, programs, and classes in a variety of media for artists of all levels. Hours: Tues - Sat, 10 am to 3 pm and by Appointment. Admission is Free. For more information, please visit www.SouthernArtsSociety.org, or their Facebook page. Contact 704.739.5585 or email SouthernArtsSociety@gmail.com.

 

“A Taste of Cornbread and Tortillas” comes to
the Clev. Co. Arts Council

Cornbread & Tortillas is a collective of Appalachian and Latino artists based in Kentucky whose mission is to build community by sharing art, music, dance, and cultural heritage. They celebrate our similarities and differences through outreach events, educational shows, workshops, and performances to create unity in a diverse world.
The Arts Council is pleased to bring this exciting group from Lexington, Kentucky, to share their mission, heritage, music, and food! They will showcase music, dance, and a taste of Appalachian, Andean, and Mexican culture. Join us Thursday, Oct. 5, at 6:00 for a FREE performance and sing-along at the Arts Council, 111 S. Washington St., Shelby.  Samples of Appalachian and Latino foods will be served.
The centerpiece of their work is the CORNBREAD & TORTILLAS theatrical show, a dynamic bilingual production featuring stories, music, and dancing. Audiences will journey from the Appalachian region of Eastern Kentucky to Mexico, Nicaragua, Ecuador, and beyond, exploring connections and celebrating our shared human experience all the while!
Cornbread & Tortillas is a show in English and Spanish devised from the life stories of the artists involved, whose cultural heritages span from Appalachia to Nicaragua, Mexico, Guatemala, Greece, and Ecuador. It contains music, dance, and stories from throughout the Americas with central themes of family, identity, work, love and art. You will see lots of instruments, including banjo, fiddle, mandolin, Andean flutes, charango, congas, and cajon, as well as mountain-style flatfooting and percussive Ballet Folklórico styles from Mexico and colorful traditional clothing.
   Weaving it all together is a narrative that illuminates the stories told through song and dance, highlighting our similarities and differences as human beings and building cultural bridges for our changing nation.
   As part of its Arts in Education outreach, the Arts Council will also present an educational program for the 2nd and 3rd graders in Cleveland County Schools on Oct. 5 & 6: “From Appalachia to the Andes”.
   This diverse show consists of two artists from Appalachia and two of Latino heritage and is a mix of Appalachian, Andean, and Mexican music, dance, and stories. Students will see and hear instruments such as the banjo, Appalachian Dulcimer, guitar, charango, zampoñas, quenas (Andean flutes), various drums, and rhythms made by dancing feet. Students will hear traditional songs of Mexico, Kentucky, and Ecuador, sung in English and Spanish. They will see and compare flatfoot dancing from Appalachia and several styles of colorful Ballet Folklórico from Mexico.
   The artists highlight the interconnections among the various cultures in a mesmerizing way that celebrates the cultures involved. Audiences come away with an enhanced appreciation for cross-cultural similarities and differences and the variety of arts present in cultures throughout the Americas.
For more information, please call 704-484-2787 or visit www.ccartscouncil.org.

 

8th Annual Miss Mountie Scholarship Pageant

Miss Mountie Scholarship Pageant Organization has announced the date for their 8th Annual Miss Mountie Scholarship Pageant on October 15, 2023 at 6 p.m. The pageant will be held at the Family Worship Center in Kings Mountain.
The pageant started in 2016 by Miss Sophia Kellstrom as her Senior Project for Kings Mountain High School. Kellstrom’s inspiration for the pageant began when she started competing in pageants at age seven. According to Kellstrom, “I gained many incredible life skills from my participation and wanted to offer those same opportunities to other young ladies in my hometown.”
The pageant awards a cash scholarship, crown, sash and gifts for Miss Mountie who should be a high school senior 17-19 years of age. The current Miss Mountie, Anna Holder, will be awarded a $1200 scholarship when she crowns her successor this coming October 15. The scholarship money is a combination of donations from the Kings Mountain community and ad sales from the pageant's program book.  The organization proudly passes on 100% of ad sale's money to the scholarship fund. 
Other age divisions for the Miss Mountie Scholarship Pageant are as follows and will receive a crown, sash and gifts: Tiny 4-6 years of age, Little 7-9 years of age, Young 10-11 years of age, Junior 12-13 years of age; and, Teen 14-16 years of age.  Additionally, new titles added this year are Baby Miss Mountie 6-12 months, Wee Miss Mountie 13-24 months; and, Mini Miss Mountie 25-36 months old.  The pageant's Executive Director, Molora Kellstrom noted "The pageant has grown every year.  And partly due to the pageant's growth and interest, we are thrilled to add the baby/toddler divisions this year."
Each contestant must compete in a private interview (length dictated by age), an on-stage question, Mountie Spirit Wear and evening gown. Contestants are required to compete for most photogenic but can elect to compete for the audience choice awards. Audience Choice is awarded to the participant donating the most non-perishable food items.  All donations will go to the Earthen Vessels benevolence ministry.  Contestants do not need to attend Kings Mountain Schools; however, they must reside in the Kings Mountain area and be able fulfill all contractual Kings Mountain events. Please note baby/toddler divisions are exempt from the private interview and on-stage question portion of the pageant.  Furthermore, baby/toddler divisions will compete on Saturday, October 14.  Entry fee for ALL age divisions is $50.
There will be a Miss Mountie Pageant interest meeting on Sunday, September 24 from 3pm to 4pm followed by a mandatory contestant meeting on Sunday, October 1 from 3pm-4pm.  Both meetings and pageant will be held at Family Worship Center in the youth sanctuary located at 1818 Shelby Road, Kings Mountain.  Pageant is open to public admission for $5.00.   Contact missmountiepageant@yahoo.com or visit Miss Mountie Scholarship Pageant on social media for paperwork or questions.
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Museum’s 20th Annual Reverse Raffle & Auction Saturday

Kings Mountain Historical Museum will host its 20th Annual Reverse Raffle and Auctions on Sat-urday, September 16, at 5:30 p.m. at the H. Lawrence Patrick Senior Center in Kings Mountain.
The fundraiser generates revenue to support the museum’s programming. The event features a Grand Prize of $10,000, and each $125 ticket includes entry for two people, two drink tickets per person, heavy hors d’oeuvres, a 1 in 300 chance of winning the $10,000 Raffle Prize, and other raf-fle items. Tickets are still available and can be purchased online, at the museum, or from a KMHM Board Member.
For more information, please call 704-739-1019 or email kmhmdirector@outlook.com.