Patrick Senior Center events

(April 7, 2021 Issue)

By Lynn Lail

 Steps to Health – Take Control: The Patrick Senior Center is offering the Steps to Health–Take Control program via Zoom by Nancy Abasiekong with the NC Cooperative Extension. Join Nancy in this 8 week program to learn lifelong habits to help you eat healthier and be more  physically active. Classes will be on Thursdays, 1:30 pm—2:30 pm. Class Dates are April 8, 15, 22, 29, and May 6, 13, 20 and 27. Session materials can be picked up at the Senior Center. Please call the Center at 704-734-0447 to register and get the Zoom link.
Interest Meeting for Upcoming Rock-a-Thon Fundraiser: The Patrick Senior Center is sponsoring an Interest Meeting for an upcoming Rock-a-Thon fundraiser in support of the 2021 Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Join us on Thursday, April 8 via Zoom from 12:00 pm to 12:30 pm to learn about how to get involved to support whose who are affected by Alzheimer’s. We need people to donate rockers for the day, sign up to rock, and also people who can donate to the cause. Everyone is welcome to support this fun event! Please call the center at 704-734-0447 to register and get the Zoom link.
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Kathlene Frances Miller and Charles David Canipe

Engagement announced

(March 31, 2021 Issue)

Tim and Shearra Miller of Kings Mountain, NC, are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter Kathlene Frances Miller of Kings Mountain, NC to Charles David Canipe of Cherryville, NC, son of Dale and Teresa Canipe of Cherryville, NC.
Ms. Miller is the granddaughter of Mrs. Geneva Beachum of Charlotte, NC.  She is a 2006 graduate of Kings Mountain High School, and a 2010 graduate of UNC Greensboro with a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education.  She is employed as a first grade teacher at East Elementary in Kings Mountain, NC.
Mr. Canipe is a 2004 graduate of West Lincoln High School and a 2011 graduate of NC State University with a Bachelor’s degree in Animal Science.  He is the founder and co-owner of Canipe Farms Shavings and Hay Supply Company in Cherryville, NC.
The happy couple met through mutual friends.  A small family ceremony is planned for April 10, with a formal wedding celebration September 11, 2021, at Zimmerwald Estate in Ellenboro, NC.  The couple will reside in Cherryville. 
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From left, Dr. Nicole Waters, associate provost of the GWU College of Health Sciences; Brooklyn Kilby, nursing student; Kim Downs, GWU First Lady; Carlene Smith, nursing student; Georgie McAbee, assistant nurse manager for the Neo-Natal ICU, Pediatrics, and Peds ICU at Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System; and Dr. Tracy Arnold, dean of the Hunt School of Nursing.

Kim Downs, Gardner-Webb First Lady, Sews Pillowcases for Children in the Hospital

(March 24, 2021 Issue)

Handmade, Cheerful Designs Donated to Spartanburg (S.C.) Regional

BOILING SPRINGS, N.C.—For a child, going to the hospital can be an unpleasant, frightening experience. Volunteers have discovered a way to help ease the fear and tension by donating hand-sewn, colorful character pillowcases that children can call their own. Joining the ranks of those volunteers is Gardner-Webb University First Lady Kim Downs, wife of president Dr. William M. Downs.
On March 11, Kim donated 100 pillowcases to Spartanburg (S.C.) Regional Healthcare System, which were accepted by Georgie McAbee, assistant nurse manager for the Neo-Natal ICU, Pediatrics, and Peds ICU. Also on hand for the presentation were College of Health Sciences Associate Provost Dr. Nicole Waters, Hunt School of Nursing Dean Dr. Tracy Arnold and Undergraduate Clinical Coordinator Dr. Sarah Tate.
Before McAbee took the pillowcases, Waters said a prayer of blessing over them, which she adapted for the occasion from a prayer by Ralph Waldo Emerson.
Little ones, this is our prayer for you.
We pray these pillowcases bring smiles when sadness intrudes, comfort on difficult days, rainbows to follow the clouds, and hugs when your spirits are low. We pray for the faith in healing so that you can believe and accept the truth of the Great Physician. We pray for blessings upon the hands that created this work, the courageous hands that will surround this work daily to provide care, and the tiny hands of the little ones as they seek comfort in this beautiful work. We give you thanks in all circumstances!
May God be the Glory for this Joy! Amen.
Kim first heard about the need for children’s pillowcases from Maynard’s Children’s Hospital when she and Dr. Downs lived in Greenville, N.C. “It was an ideal ministry for me, because as a pharmacist, I had an odd work schedule that often prevented me from getting involved with weekly, set time ministries,” Kim related. “After we moved here, I met Gardner-Webb alumna Barbara Greene, and that’s when the idea of a Gardner Webb pillowcase ministry really took off.”
Greene and others from Boiling Springs Baptist Church have been sewing pillowcases for various children’s nonprofit organizations for several years. During halftime at a GWU men’s basketball game last season, Downs and Greene shared pictures of the pillowcases they have made. “Barbara even gave me a tutorial of how to sew the pillowcases with French seams, so that there are no frayed edges on the inside,” Kim elaborated. “In hindsight, the timing was fabulous, because soon COVID shut everything down, and all of a sudden, I had a lot of free time on my hands. So, I sewed.”
When Leah Clevenger, director of Alumni Relations, and Nate Evans, vice president of Advancement, saw the cheerful pillowcases with koala bears, mermaids, dinosaurs, kittens, dogs, flowers, planets, airplanes, etc., Clevenger immediately had an idea. “She suggested donating them to the hospitals where our nursing students train,” Kim explained. “I love that these pillowcases will bring some sunshine to hospitalized children. It’s a blessing to me to sew them, and I hope they will be a blessing to the children as well.”
Kim plans to keep sewing to have more pillowcases to donate. “I’ve since recruited several friends who love to sew, and they are making pillowcases as well,” she shared. “My hope is that we can make 500 pillowcases per year for the hospitals, but I’d love to expand the ministry to some of our United Way partners, as well. I encourage others to get involved too—either by sewing or making donations to help cover the cost of fabric.”
Monetary donations to the Bulldog Pillowcase Ministry, may be made to Clevenger at lclevenger@gardner-webb.edu. Those who want to join the “Seam Team” and sew pillowcases, may contact Kim at kdowns@gardner-webb.edu.
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RECIPE CORNER

(March 24, 2021 Issue)

Editor’s Note: (The recipes in today’s Cooking Corner are from “50 Years of Serving Children” by Cleveland County School 
Food Service Association.)

SUNDAY 
CHICKEN
DINNER
Diana Hamrick
KM Middle School
6 chicken breasts
1 can cream of chicken 
   soup
2 cups rice
1 cup chicken broth
Salt and pepper to taste
2 Tbsp. sage
¼ cup margarine, melted
Pour rice in casserole dish. Place chicken on rice. Mix soup with 1 can of water and chicken broth. Pour over rice and chicken. Salt and pepper to taste. Mix sage with melted margarine. Pour over chicken and rice. Cook for 1 hour on 350 degrees. Serves 6.

MELT I N YOUR MOUTH CHICKEN PIE
Patsy Rountree
KM Schools
1 chicken, cooked and 
   deboned
2 cups broth
1 can cream of chicken
   soup

1 stick margarine, melted
2 cups self-rising flour
2 cups buttermilk
Place chicken in 9x12 dish. Bring broth and soup to boil. Remove from heat and pour over chicken. Mix margarine, flour, and buttermilk and pour over chicken. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Brown at 450 degrees for 10 minutes.

SQUASH PATTIES
Mary Bennett
KMHS
4 cups cooked squash, mashed
1 egg, beaten
1 cup onions, chopped
1 cup flour
Salt and pepper to taste
Mix ingredients together. Drop by tablespoons into pan with oil and fry until browned.


ANGEL BISCUITS
Annie Mae Berry
Grover Elementary
2 ½ cups self-rising flour
2 Tbsp. sugar
1 pkg. yeast in ¼ cup warm water
4 Tbsp. Crisco
1 cup buttermilk
Mix all ingredients; kneed and set in refrigerator overnight. Kneed again. Cut  biscuits and  let rise for at least 2 hours, then bake. Makes 12 to 16 biscuits.

East Gold Street Wesleyan Church
Easter Egg Hunt April 3

(March 24, 2021 Issue)

East Gold Street Wesleyan Church will hold their Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 3, 10 am-12 pm. This is a free event for ages birth-5th grade.
There will be snacks, story time, music, prizes and lots of fun.
Bring your own basket.
They will follow Covid-9 safe guidelines.

East Gold Street Wesleyan
Food Pantry March 25

(March 24, 2021 Issue)

The Good Neighbors food pantry at East Gold Street Wesleyan church will be open Thursday, March 25th  from 5:30 - 6:15 pm. Drive around to the back of the church and we will deliver to your car.

KMPD welcomes Officer John Tinoco

(March 24, 2021 Issue)

By Loretta Cozart

Kings Mountain’s newest Police Officer that was sworn in on March 11, at City Hall. City Clerk Karen Tucker swore him in as Mayor Pro Tem Keith Miller presided over the ceremony.
“KMPD is very proud to welcome Officer John Tinoco to our KMPD family. He will be an asset to this department and to the community in Kings Mountain that he serves,” said Chief Proctor. “We are very proud to have him join our team.
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LORETTA COZART

Pieces of  Kings Mountain History

(March 24, 2021 Issue)

I recently learned of a time capsule buried on the campus of KMHS in 1964, while the Phifer Road facility was under construction. Former teacher Carolyn McWhirter taught history at KMHS, then housed at Central’s campus on Ridge Street.
As an assignment, students brought to class items for a time capsule. A student’s parent fabricated the capsule, and all the items were sealed inside. The students put the capsule in the courtyard of the new school for safekeeping. The year was approximately 1964 and Carolyn’s husband Carl recently shared the story with me. He cannot remember the exact date the capsule was placed, but said it was done while the walls of the school were under construction.
It has been a tough year for me, and even more so for the McWhirter family, because Carolyn passed away one year ago last week. Carl remembered the story and shared it with me on Thursday. He participated in the project and said the students dug down several feet, placed the capsule, and put a bag of concrete on top of it, “to prevent the Shelby Lions from digging it up.” (The schools were in a heated rivalry then; I guess some things never change.) The time capsule was then covered over with dirt.
I am interested to see if the time capsule is still there. Wouldn’t that make a great story for the paper and a great lesson for students? The exact location of the capsule was also shared, and I wondered if the school would be interested in digging the time capsule to see what the students of 1964 thought future generations might be interested to learn about them. I reached out to Dr. Stephen Fisher at Cleveland County Schools and await a decision from him.
Carolyn McWhirter was an excellent History teacher. Later in her career she impacted countless lives as a guidance counselor by encouraging students to continue their educations after high school. From my own personal experience, I can attest that Carolyn was an exceptional teacher, mentor, and friend who loved her students dearly.
Carl estimated that 25 students participated in the project, going to new KMHS campus to place the marker. If you participated in this exercise, please let me know. When I write my next article on this topic, I would love to include students’ perspectives on the activity and the process they used to determine what should be placed in the time capsule. If we do find the capsule, I’ll be sure to photograph the contents to share the story with our readers.
Loretta Cozart can be reached by email at LHCozart@cccom.com.
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MAYOR NEISLER

Legislators allege wrongdoing
regarding casino, but offer no proof

(March 24, 2021 Issue)


AG Stein says he has no jurisdiction 

By Loretta Cozart

Mayor Scott Neisler reached out to the Herald on Sunday regarding a story that ran on WRAL News on Friday, March 19, and an interview he had with the news outlet earlier that day.
“I am being open with the Herald, because I want to be transparent and say there is no truth to the allegations regarding my family and the casino, as is alleged in a letter written by Susan Fisher, D-Buncombe, and thirteen NC Democrats and who requested an inquiry by Attorney General Josh Stein.”
In the story by Travis Fain, WRAL’s statehouse reporter, “Fisher and other lawmakers who signed the letter asking Stein to intervene said they couldn't point to specific wrongdoing, but they worry about land deals surrounding the project and who stands to gain.”
Mayor Neisler is mentioned specifically in the letter alleging he and his family stand to benefit from the casino being built nearby. “This is, yet again, another heavy handed attempt by the Eastern Band of  the Cherokee Indians to influence the outcome of the casino in Kings Mountain,” Mayor Scott Neisler said. “The Cherokees have estimated they will lose 100 million dollars when the Catawba open up so it is understandable why they are doing anything they can to stop it!”
The story also reported, “The casino letter was circulated by a lobbyist for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians,” however the lobbyist was not named. The story went on to report that “many of the signers are from western North Carolina, where the Cherokee tribe has stronger political influence. But some are from the Triangle area.”
   The letter got no traction with AG Stein and the story went on to report, “The attorney general plans to decline, with a spokeswoman telling WRAL News on Friday that the office ‘does not have authority to launch an investigation like this’ without a request from a local district attorney.”
In the article, WRAL reported “Neisler told them Friday that he would welcome an investigation. He said he doesn't expect to profit from the casino and that the roughly 700 acres his family owns a few miles from the project is, for the most part, being mined and ‘not buildable because of the mineral rights on it. This heavy-handed pressure the Cherokees have put on our state legislators by attempting to manufacture a conspiracy theory is shameful,’ he added.”
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Pictured L-R: West Elementary Principal Heather Pagan, Jazmine Jimenez-Chaires and Booster Club President Mark McDaniel.

Jazine Jimenez-Chaires
KMHS Booster Club
Good Citizen of Week

(March 17, 2021 Issue)

The Kings Mountain High School Booster Club would like to honor Jazmine Jimenez-Chaires as their Good Citizen of the week. Jazmine is a 4th grade student at West Elementary School in Mrs. Patrick’s class.
Jazmine is an incredible student that exemplifies positive characteristics in the total school environment each day. She excels academically and displays an optimistic attitude that is contagious. Jasmine is always willing to help others on campus. She is very kind to her peers and respectful to all adults. Outside of school she enjoys art and dance.
Jazmine is the daughter of Alex Gutirrez and Claudia Chaires.
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John McGill, left, received recognition as a Main Street Champion in 2020. Photo by Christy Conner

John McGill named a Main Street Champion of 2020

(March 17, 2021 Issue)

34 North Carolina Main Street Champions were recognized virtually for their commitment to downtown revitalization and strong communities during a virtual recognition ceremony    on March 11.
Kings Mountain’s John McGill was recognized for renovating 133 W. Mountain Street last year and the building is now being used as one of Kings Mountain’s newest restaurants. Thirty-eight Main Street Champions received honors for contributions to their Main Street programs and downtown districts last year. Including the 2020 honorees, 804 Champions have been recognized since 2000.
 “There are three keys to economic development success: public-private partnerships that share in the effort and jointly celebrate the successes of projects; economic development strategies that leverage local assets for authentic enhancements and improvements; and local champions that are leading the effort every step of the way,” said Kenny Flowers, Assistant Secretary for Rural Economic Development at the North Carolina Department of Commerce.  “The Main Street program throughout the state, is the epitome of the implementation of these three key components of success.”
“N.C. Commerce and N.C. Main Street have been recognizing Main Street Champions for more than two decades. We know that the success of downtown districts is because of the people behind the effort, and each year, we recognize the visionary individuals that have a strong sense of commitment to their community. They develop projects that improve quality of life, grow cultural and recreational development, renovate historic properties and spur investment and create jobs and businesses,” said Liz Parham, director of the N.C. Main Street and Rural Planning Center.
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RECIPE CORNER

(March 17, 2021 Issue)

(Ed. Note: The recipes in today’s Cooking Corner are from “Monumental 
Recipes,’’ a cookbook by Kings Mountain 
Woman’s Club.)

TOMATO PIE
Cup & Saucer Tea Room
2 or 3 tomatoes sliced to
  cover bottom of pie 
  shell
Sprinkling of dried basil
Bunch of chopped green 
   onions
1 9-inch prebaked deep 
   dish pie crust
1 c. cheddar cheese, 
   grated
1 c/ mozzarella cheese, 
   grated
1 c/ mayonnaise
Salt and pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Layer tomato slices, basil and onion in baked pie shell. Add salt and pepper to taste. Mix together cheese and mayonnaise. Spread on top of tomatoes and bake until lightly browned.

BAKED BEANS
Marty Blanton KMPD
1 lb. No. 3 can Pork N 
   Beans
1 lb. sausage
2 T. brown sugar
2 T. molasses
½ cup catsup
½ cup water
Prepared mustard to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
In a large deep casserole dish, empty Pork N Beans, cooked and drained sausage, brown sugar, molasses, catsup, water, mustard, salt and pepper. Mix well and cook for one hour in 350- degree oven. (if you don’t have molasses, increase brown sugar by 2 T).

CUBE STEAK AND GRAVY
Jerry Tessneer KMPD
1 lb. cube steak
1 cup flour
Salt and pepper to taste
1 can cream of mushroom
   soup
1 can cream of chicken soup
Flour and salt and pepper steak. Then fry it until it is brown on both sides. Put your soups in a large pot. Mix well and put cube steak in the soup and let it simmer for about 1 hour. It will melt in your mouth.

GRAHAM CRACKER FRUIT CAKE
Jean Davis
16 oz. marshmallows, melted
1 box white raisins
16 oz. cherries, sliced
1 box graham crackers, crushed
1 cup milk
3 cups chopped pecans
Save 12 cherries and 12 pecans for top of cake. Mix ingredients together. Line graham cracker box with foil. Pack mixture into box. Refrigerate 12 hours before serving.

 
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Denise Wright

Denise Wright named
Realtor of the Year

(March 17, 2021 Issue)

Denise Wright wof Coldwell Banker Mountain View, was named Realtor of the Year by the Cleveland County Association of Realtors.
The purpose of this award is to recognize a Realtor member of the association who has made significant contributions during the year or over a period of years to their profession and their community.
Wright is a Realtor/Broker and President of Mountain View Real Estate Inc.  She is a native of Cleveland County, a graduate of Burns High School and UNC Charlotte. Her career in Real Estate began in 2004.
She has been very active in Cleveland County Associations of Realtors, having served on the Finance, Legislative, MLS, Scholarship and Core Standards Committees, on a NCAR committee and as an officer of the Association.  Denise has served the association as Treasurer for 6 years.
Within the community, Wright serves on the boards of the Department of Social Services and Crime Stoppers. She is a member of the Junior Charity League of Shelby and Eastside Baptist Church, and participates with a team in the annual Relay for Life.
Denise is also a multi year recipient of Coldwell Bankers Presidents Award, most recently Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle for her production in 2020. This is Awarded to individual sales associates who are in the top 5% of all Coldwell Banker Agents.
Coldwell Banker is the oldest and most recognized name in real estate with offices all over the United States and the world. Coldwell Banker has been working since 1903 to help clients b    uy and sell real estate.
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Cub Scout Pack 93 with K9 Officer CJ Cooke.

Cub Scouts meet for first time in a year  to thank law enforcement officers

(March 17, 2021 Issue)

By Loretta Cozart

After a year without meeting, Cub Scout Pack 93 from East Elementary school has joined forces with Pack 92 at Central United Methodist Church in Kings Mountain where can finally meet.
As a recent service project and a thank you to Kings Mountain Police department, the Lion, Tiger and Wolf dens put together a thank you treat bag. Each bag contained a  Survival Kit for Law Enforcement Officers.
• Life Saver: To remind you of the many times  you’ve been one.
• Starburst: For the burst of energy you’ll need.
• Payday: Because you are not doing it for the money.
• Paper Clip: To help you hold it all together.
• Hershey Kisses: To show our Love for you.
• Gum: To help your unit stick together.
• Tootsie Roll: To help you roll with the punches.
• Peppermint Patty: To help keep your mind cool.
• Snickers: To remind you to keep your sense of humor.
• Mounds: For the “mounds” of courage you need.
Thank you for your service.
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Deborah Hoyle, left, accepts her American Legion Volunteer Hospital pin from District Director Linda Quinlan. Photo by Loretta Cozart

Hoyle and Lemmon honored for service to Veterans

(March 17, 2021 Issue)

By Loretta Cozart

Deborah Hoyle and Patsy Payne Lemmon were recognized for service hours to veterans during the March 11 meeting of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. District 13 District Director Linda Quinlan awarded Deborah Hoyle the American Legion Auxiliary Volunteer Hospital pin and bar for 4,000 hours of service.
Patsy Payne Lemmon was unable to attend, so Hoyle received on her behalf the American Legion Auxiliary Volunteer Hospital pin and bar for 300 hours of service. Lemmon drove Hoyle to purchase materials and often contributed toward her projects.
Hoyle crochets afghans and lapghans for veterans in local nursing homes. Together, she and Lemmon delivered those needed items to veterans for many years.
“These women exemplify what it means to be American Legion Auxiliary members. Supporting our veterans is at the core of the American Legion Auxiliary and our mission. The number of hours these women volunteered is amazing. It is with great honor I award these pins to Deborah and Pat,” Quinlan said.
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Kellie Jayne Ford – Blake Stillwell

Ford-Stillwell Engagement

(March 17, 2021 Issue)

Mr. and  Mrs. Jay Ford of Kings Mountain, NC are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Kellie Jayne Ford of Kings Mountain, NC to Darren Blake Stillwell of Gastonia, NC, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sonny ‘Pete’ Stillwell of Gastonia, NC.
Miss Ford is the granddaughter of Mrs. Patsy Shumaker of Charlotte, NC and Mrs. Mamie Ford of Lenoir, NC. She is a 2013 graduate of Kings Mountain High School, a 2017 graduate of North Carolina State University with a Bachelor’s degree of Communications, a 2018 graduate of Liberty University with a Master’s degree of Human Resource Counseling and is currently working on her PHD. She is employed as a 6th grade teacher at Kings Mountain Intermediate School.
Mr. Stillwell is the grandson of Carol Garrison of Gastonia, NC. He is a 2012 graduate of Hunter Huss High School in Gastonia, and a 2017 graduate of Gardner Webb University with a Bachelor’s degree of Sports Management. He is currently employed as a Residential Sales Representative for Dominion Energy in Gastonia, NC.
The happy couple met at Chapel Grove Baptist Church in Gastonia, NC. The wedding is planned for November 6, 2021 at Spinning Leaf Vineyard in Shelby, NC. The couple will reside in Cherryville.

State Highway Patrol 
non-profit foundation

 (March 17, 2021 Issue)

The State Highway Patrol is proud to announce the first ever non-profit 501(c)(3) titled “North Carolina State Highway Patrol Foundation.”
The North Carolina State Highway Patrol’s non-profit foundation was founded by Board Chairwoman, Melissa Sutherland and is comprised of local business leaders, community members, legal and financial professionals whose primary mission is to support the organization’s needs in the areas of training, equipment and other invaluable tools which would strengthen our mission by providing the highest level of service and protection to the citizens of this state. More importantly, the foundation will provide immediate financial assistance to members and their families who are either critically injured or die while in the performance of their duties.
"Our resolve to carry out our honorable mission is unwavering and will remain steadfast as we address the needs of our members and their families," said Colonel Glenn M. McNeill, Jr.  "The bravery, courage and tireless work displayed by both past and present members, truly merits the cause behind this great foundation."
For more information, please go to www.ncshpfoundation.org to learn more about the foundation’s mission, the Board of Directors, donating options and upcoming events.

Easter Sunrise service planned

(March 17, 2021 Issue)

The Kings Mountain Ministerial Association will be leading in an Easter Sunrise Service on Easter Sunday, April 4 at 7:00 a.m. at Mountain Rest Cemetery.
The service will be held around the large white cross in the cemetery.
In the event of inclement weather, the service will be moved to Eastside Baptist Church, 308 York Road, Kings Mountain.  If the event is held inside, everyone  is requested to wear a mask.
The Easter Sunrise message will be delivered by Pastor Ron Caulder from Eastside Baptist Church.  Special music will be provided by East Gold Wesleyan Church.
Everyone is invited to attend.  The service will be approximately 30 minutes.
Come and let’s celebrate the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus!
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Dr. William Downs, President of Gardner-Webb University received his COVID shot from Jacob Wallace at the COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic at Cleveland Community College on March 5. Mountain Street Pharmacy and Shelby Drugstore in conjuection with Cleveland County Health Center hosted the clinic. Photos provided

Community responds to administer additional vaccines

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

By Loretta Cozart

Mountain Street Pharmacy and Shelby Drugstore, in conjunction with the Cleveland County Public Health Center, hosted a COVID-19 Vaccine clinic on Friday, March 5 at Cleveland Community College.
Organizer and Pharmacist Allan Propst, BS R.PH, spoke of the event, “All in all, I was very pleased.”
This was a team effort, and he thanks everyone who assisted in organizing and manning the vaccine clinic, putting 300 shots into arms, and moving Cleveland County closer toward herd immunity.
“First, I’d like to thank DeShay Oliver, Deputy Health Director of Cleveland County Public Health Center for reaching out to Mountain Street Pharmacy and Shelby Drug Store to administer the COVID vaccines,” Propst said. “I also want to thank Director of Pharmacy, Dr. Chris Breeze, Pharm.D. for his help”
Once the decision was made to move ahead with the clinic, a location many could access was needed, and Cleveland Community College (CCC) was a logical location. “Many thanks to the COVID Response Team of CCC who got the necessary approvals from President Dr. Jason Hurst. Allen Kniceley, Director of Human Resources, Safety and Organizational Development and Bruce Mack, EdD, were a great help with the logistical aspects at the site,” Propst said.
The team was tasked with vaccinating 300 people from the community, including faculty and staff from Gardner-Webb University and Cleveland Community College. President Dr. William Downs and Barry Lane, Director - Environmental and Occupational Safety approved additional support from the university.
“Many thanks go to Gardner Webb’s Hunt School of Nursing, including Dr. Nicole Waters, Associate Provost for the College of Health Sciences, Dr. Anna Hamrick, Associate Dean/Associate Professor of Nursing, and Esther Porter, Clinical Administrative Coordinator of the PA program who managed the workflow and provided nine nursing students for the clinic,” Propst said.
Mountain Street Pharmacy provided Pharmacist immunizers including Allan Propst, Everett Lewis, Jr., Jacob Wallace, and Retired Registered Nurse Mary Lou Ware.
Shelby Drug Pharmacy Pharmacist Immunizers were Gary Hardin and Jeff Nunnery, along with Certified Tech Immunizer Mark Woodall and Pharmacy Tech Angela Poston.
Community volunteers from The Walt Disney Company included Jim Larson, Wayne Hawkins, and Barbara Justice. Additional community volunteers included Tricia Propst, Megan Poston, and Allison Houser.
Allan Propst also thanks Tabitha Thomas from Patrick Senior Center for taking calls and scheduling screenings. Additionally, CCC’s EMS Instructor, Matt Childers approved providing Adjunct Instructor Brandon Ferguson to be on-site the entire day.
“This was definitely a group effort and I am grateful to all those who helped through the roles they played. The event ran very smoothly and that can be attributed to the professionals who volunteered to help in this effort. It was hard work but made for a very rewarding day,” Propst concluded.
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Pictured L-R Principal Amy Allen, Marshall Frye and Booster Club President Mark McDaniel. (photo proviced)

Marshall Frye honored as
KMHS Booster Club Good Citizen

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

Kings Mountain High School Booster Club would like to honor
Marshall Frye, fourth grader from North Elementary School as their Good
Citizen.
Marshall is the son of Justin and Kimberly Frye. His grandparents are Randy and Lynda Frye of Kings Mountain, Cathy Carter of Martinsville, VA and the late John Carter.
Marshall enjoys playing video games, spending time outside with his brothers, working in the garden, swimming, reading, drawing and playing piano. His favorite subject at school is reading.
Marshall exemplifies the true meaning of citizenship. He believes in treating other individuals the way he wants to be treated. He stands up for what he believes to be the right way. Marshall is a responsible, hard-working student, and he is a true example of integrity.
He is a positive role model to others by being informative, active and involved with his family, peers, school, teachers and community.

Food pantry
March 11

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

The Good Neighbors food pantry at East Gold Street Wesleyan church will be open Thursday, March 11th  from 5:30 - 6:15 pm. Drive around to the back of the church we will deliver to your car. 

Peoples Church
31st Anniversary
celebration

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

Peoples Church, Kings Mtn. NC will be celebrating the 31st Pastoral Anniversary of  Dr. John and Lady Fonda Houze on Sunday, March 21, 2020 at 9:00 AM.
All are cordially invited to come and celebrate this  historical and blessed event  honoring all God has done, is doing and will do at Peoples Church.
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Patrick Senior Center happenings

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

By Tabitha Thomas

• S.H.O.P. Food Pantry: Please call if you need food, Depends, Boost, or a mask. We will check our supply and arrange a time for you to come by!
• Friday Drive Through: Feel free to drop by each Friday morning between 10 am and 12 pm to pick up a goodie bag and say hello! We ask that you drive around the front of the center and pull around to the back under the canopy. We will be smiling behind our masks and ready to say hello! Please stay in your car, and we will bring your goodie bag to you.
• Facebook LIVE: We now have our own Patrick Senior Center Facebook page! We do a LIVE show every Monday through Thursday morning at 10 am. Come join us for conversation, updates, and riddles!
• Weekly Wellness: Join us each Thursday morning on Facebook LIVE at 11 am to 11:30 am for an exercise routine, some deep breathing or stretching. You will be glad you did!
• Senior Center Donations Needed: Personal hygiene products, Depends, toilet paper, tissues, paper towels, cleaning & laundry products, masks, activity books, canned and dry goods, microwavable meals, and pet food. Individually packaged items: pudding, fruit, soup, Pop Tarts, cereal, mac & cheese, peanut butter, oatmeal, grits, etc.
• Conference Call Programs: Bible History—Tuesdays, 10 am to 11 am and Faith & Fellowship—Wednesdays, 9:30 am to 10:30 am. Once you sign up, you will be given a phone number to call and a list of guidelines will be mailed to you, or you can drive by the Senior Center to pick them up.
• Senior Games: Monday, April 12—Friday, April 16. If you would like information about the 2021 Senior Games, please call Karen Grigg. Deadline to sign up is April 1.
• Mobile Red Cross Blood Drive: Friday, April 16, 10 am to 2:30 pm at the Patrick Senior Center. Please call Karen Grigg at the Center to schedule an appointment. Your donation could save a life!
• Zoom Knitting Class: (Online via Zoom) on Tuesdays, 8:30 am to 10:30 am. Call Karen Grigg to get the link to join.
 • Programs are open to people ages 55 and up. For updates or more information of any of these events, please call 704-734-0447.
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Recipe Corner

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

Ed. Note: The recipes in today’s Cooking Corner are from “100 Years in the Kitchen,” a cookbook by Women of the Church of First Presbyterian Church.”

CHOCOLATE
POUND CAKE
Ginny Maner
½ lb. butter
½ cup margarine
3 cups sugar
5 eggs
3 cups flour
¼ tsp. salt
½ t. baking powder
½ cup cocoa
1 ¼ cup whole milk
1 tsp. vanilla
(All ingredients at room temperature.)
Cream butter, margarine and sugar well. Sift flour, salt, baking powder and cocoa together. Add 5 eggs one at a time, beating well after each egg. Add flour mixture alternately with milk. Add vanilla last. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 hour and 20 minutes in a greased then dusted with cocoa in a Bundt pan.

BANANA
 PUDDING
Jane King
3 small pkgs. instant 
  vanilla pudding
5 cups milk
1 small carton sour cream
1 large Cool Whip (leave
   some for topping)
Bananas
Vanilla wafers
Mix first 4 ingredients and layer beginning with wafers, adding bananas, then pudding, etc. Place remainder of Cool Whip on top layer of pudding.

OVEN BAKED 
STEW BEEF
Christine Ramseur
Trim off some of the fat. Add 1 can onion soup and 1 can mushroom soup undiluted. Cover with foil and bake at 325 degrees for 3 h ours. Serve over rice.

LAYERED
PEA SALAD
Arlene Barrett
2 c. shredded lettuce
1 c. celery, chopped
1 large Spanish onion, 
   sliced
1 c. sliced water 
   chestnuts
1 No. 2 can early peas, 
   drained
1 c. mayonnaise
Sugar
Parmesan cheese
Put the above in layers. Spread with mayonnaise. Sprinkle lightly with sugar and Parmesan cheese. Cover and refrigerate several hours before serving. Mix together before serving.

 
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Judy Ford of MML talks to YMCA students about gardening. (Photo by YMCA)

YMCA and Library teach children to grow food

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

Mauney Memorial Library, in partnership with the Patrick Senior Center, will be creating a community garden on the Patrick Center grounds this spring. This garden will be an educational, instructional and leisure place for all community members.
Part of the educational/instructional component of the garden is a collaboration with the YMCA student care program. Instruction sessions will be facilitated by Judy Ford, Master Gardener, in conjunction with the library. Student participants will be learning how to grow seeds into plants and care for the seedlings until they are transplanted into the garden. These plants will then be planted in a raised bed in the community garden that will be only for the YMCA student participants.
If conditions permit, YMCA students will go to the community garden and be taught how to plant their seedlings into the bed and how to bring them to harvest. They will then be encouraged to come to the garden and take care of their plants throughout the growing season. YMCA participants will be able to take a sample of their harvest home to enjoy. This educational opportunity will teach community children how their food is grown and allow them to be able to know how to produce their own gardens through the instructional workshops provided.
“The YMCA would like to thank Christina M Martin and City of Kings Mountain /Mauney Memorial Library for allowing the YMCA participate in the gardening project,” shared Ranata Wingo, YMCA Director of Family Programs.
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Cat in the Hat’s virtual
birthday bash this Thursday

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

Join everyone’s favorite cat in a madcap adventure as we celebrate Read Across America and the birthday of Dr. Seuss! Sigmon Theatrical  is well known for their signature performance of Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat, and they've crafted this interactive performance (starring that crazy cat) exclusively for virtual streaming. This program is jam-packed with stories, cake baking, magic tricks, songs, circus feats, and shenanigans out the wazoo! This virtual birthday bash will leave everyone laughing and saying WOW! Presented live on the Mauney Library Facebook page.
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McVay’s art featured in book cover

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

By Loretta Cozart

Janie McVay’s art was seen online by Larry B. Hill, a childhood friend, and he reached out asking her to illustrate the cover of his newest book, The Bizarre Adventures of Jesse Wilson: A Journey Into Self Destruction. The book was recently released on Amazon
McVay began drawing as a child in South Carolina, where she and Hill met, and she has continued to draw throughout her life. “I am self-taught. Drawing was a favorite pastime of mine. I remember drawing on brown paper bags when I was young. As I got older, I was told that there was no future in art because there was just no money in it. I received little encouragement there, so for me art became a hobby.”
In 2014, she retired from City of Kings Mountain’s billing department after working there for 15-years. It was then she turned to her art in earnest and began taking classes at the Southern Arts Society. “I learned a lot from the other artists and began working in different media.”
“I find great joy in drawing and have been commissioned for several pieces. Even though I am retired, I stay busy. I enjoy the arts and it helps me stay active in the community. Friends have also encouraged me to write, so I have written some poetry that others say is good. But my true love is drawing.”
When illustrating the cover of Hill’s book, McVay listened to the author’s description of the character and the many places he visited. “I can visualize something and draw it. In this instance, I envisioned a dreamscape filled with the character’s visions of things to come and memories of things he had experienced,” she said. “I drew him sitting on a rock overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge, intertwined with images of the Empire State Building, mountains, and other things he saw on his journey from New York to California. As he looks out on the bay, he is lost in thoughts about his own life.”
The Bizarre Adventures of Jesse Wilson: A Journey Into Self Destruction, welcomes the reader into the mind of a truly lonely child growing up in Harlem New York during the 1960s. He witnesses much too much, and much too soon. The horror and mayhem becomes a part of his daily life, and he struggles to make it from one day to the next; with only his mother to rely on...even though he also had a father.
   The book explores his teenage years in South Carolina after the death of his best friend...his mother. It is in the military where he first experiments in the dark world of street drugs. That is the time when his voyage of self-destruction begins.
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Sophia Wilson  Good Citizen

(March 10, 2021 Issue)

Kings Mountain High School Booster Club would like to honor Sophia Wilson, fourth grader from Bethware Elementary School as their first Good Citizen for the week for KMHS football. Sophia always has a positive attitude and  a willingness to help everyone around her. She is a model student and everyone who meets her calls her a “ray of sunshine”. Sophia’s favorite subject is math and during her free time she loves to play outside, watch tv, and have quality time with her family. She is the daughter of Jeffrey and Erin Wilson. Pictured above left to right: Bethware Principal Dr. Amy Jones, Sophia and  Booster Club President Mark McDaniel.
 
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All of these students truly personify the Rotary motto of  "SERVICE ABOVE SELF" to wake up early on a cold Saturday morning to help beautify their school and city.

KMHS Interact Club 
Serves community

(March 4, 2021 Issue)

Kings Mountain High School Interact Club, an offshoot of KM Rotary Club, was " back in action" last Saturday doing a service learning project-performing a trash pick up around the school properties and on Kings Mountain Boulevard.
The club, which is primarily a service and leadership program, has not been active since the Covid lockdown last March. "My club members were ready to get back in the saddle- serving Kings Mountain" said Margot Plonk, the club's faculty advisor. "We were thankful that Mrs. Rikard allowed us to hold this service event." It was held Saturday, February 20th, in a safe manner, with each participant practicing social distancing and wearing masks. Plonk says that Mayor Scott Neisler was most helpful in securing tools for the club to complete this clean up event. 10 students showed up to help, including present Interact Club president, Harley Dallas, and former Interact Club president from 3 years ago, Gracie Plonk, who is now a Junior at East Carolina University. 
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Joy Barbee

North School announces spelling bee winner 

(March 4, 2021 Issue)

Joy Barbee is the North Elementary Schools’ spelling bee winner. She is a fourth grader in Mrs. Orders class and will compete in the Cleveland County Spelling Bee on March 24th at 10 am at Cleveland Community College. 
Photo provided by Anna Hughes
 
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Senior Center March schedule

(March 4, 2021 Issue)

By Tabitha Thomas

Senior Center participation is open to adults age 55 and over (registration required – call for details.)
Hours of Operation: Staff available by phone 8 am-5 pm, Mon-Fri.
Outdoor Walking Track open 9 am-4 pm
Rentals: No rentals through March (Call Bonnie Hale for later dates)
   NC SHIIP Program
If you are getting ready to start Medicare, please call for information about enrollment periods, supplements and drug plans! You may qualify for Extra Help with your medications! Also, please call between Jan 1-March 31 if you are on a Medicare Advantage plan and want to make a change.
Check out our “Medicare 101” presentation through Zoom!
Tuesday, March 9, 5:30-7 pm
Please call to register and to get Zoom link.
St. Patrick’s DayDrive-Thru
Wednesday, March 17 10 am—12 pm
For the wee bit of Irish at heart! Just drive around to the back of the building for a quick hello and a St. Patty’s surprise! Please call to RSVP by Friday, March 12.
   Friday Drive-Thru
Friday Mornings, 10 am -12 pm. Please drive around to the back to say hello! Please stay in your car and we will bring you your goodie bag and masks if you need them. Food bags, Boost and Depends will no longer be distributed at the Drive-Thru in order to cut down on wait times. Please call Glenda to register for food, Depends or Boost and to be given pick-up times for these items.
   Income Tax Assistance provided by Liberty Tax 
Beginning Monday, January 25, you may drop off your tax documents at the Patrick Center back entrance on Monday or Tuesday afternoons between 12 pm and 2:30 pm.
When you drop off your documents, we will make a copy and get them to Liberty Tax, and you will be given an appointment to complete your taxes curbside at the Patrick Center on a Wednesday afternoon or at their office in Gastonia on a Thursday afternoon. Returns can also be sent to you via email for completion. Please call the center for more information including what documents to bring.
   Conference Call 
Programs
Bible History—Tuesdays, 10 am 11 am
Faith & Fellowship—Wednesdays, 9:30 am -10:30 am
This is a chance to meet new friends and participate in a program over the phone! Call the Center for more details and to sign up!
S.H.O.P. Pantry
Please call if you need food, incontinence supplies, or nutritional supplements. We will check our supply and arrange a time for you to come by! (Delivery also available if needed).
All clients must a registered participant before picking up these items.
Telephone Reassurance
Designed to help homebound elderly to remain independent in their own homes for as long as possible. Volunteers will provide reassuring telephone calls on pre-arranged days. Please call Glenda for more information.
   Donations Needed: 
Personal hygiene products, Depends, toilet paper, tissues, paper towels, cleaning & laundry products, masks, canned and dry goods, microwavable meals, and pet food. Individually packaged items: pudding, fruit, soup, Pop Tarts, cereal, mac & cheese, peanut butter, etc.
   Facebook Live!
We now have our own Patrick Senior Center Facebook page! We do a LIVE show on Monday through Thursday at 10 am. Come join us for conversation, updates, and riddles!
   Transportation
TACC can currently take you to your doctor appointments or bring you to the Senior Center once we reopen. Call Bonnie Hale to find out more about this service.
Other services we can help connect you to:
Home Repairs, In Home and Respite Care, Job Placement/Job Skills, Hospice and Palliative Care, Reverse Mortgage Counseling, Medicaid/Social Security Benefits, Home Delivered Meals, Mental Health Services, Disaster Preparedness, Long-term care/Ombudsman, Rehab Services, and Durable Medical Equipment Loan Program. Call Glenda for more information about these services!
   Mass Call System
We have a way to call all our participants and give them updates. If you have not been receiving calls and would like to get them, please call the center to be added to the list!
The Patrick Center is located at 909 E. King Street Kings Mountain, NC 28086, (704) 734-0447.

Alzheimer’s program presented on March 10

(March 4, 2021 Issue)

Mauney Memorial Library and Kings Mountain Senior Center present Virtual 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's online on March 10 from 3 – 4 pm.
Alzheimer’s causes changes in memory, thinking and behavior that are not normal aging. Join us to learn about:
• The difference between normal aging and Alzheimer’s.
• Common warning signs.
• The importance of early detection and benefits of diagnosis.
• Next steps and expectations for the diagnostic process.
• Alzheimer’s Association resources.
• Visit alz.org/CRF to explore additional education programs online and in your area.
Participants will be given the option of joining via video/webinar or through a toll-free number. Registrants will be sent conferencing details prior to the date of the program. Registration closes the day before the scheduled program. If you are registering late or need the link/ phone information, please call 1-800-272-3900. This program is open to all.
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Summer Learning Option clears NC House with support from local superintendents

(March 4, 2021 Issue)

Legislation giving North Carolina families the choice to attend in-person summer learning programs in public schools cleared multiple state House committees on Tuesday with support from local superintendents who spoke in favor of the bill.
House Bill 82 Summer Learning Choice for NC Families would provide six-weeks of classroom instruction, five days a week, for families who choose to participate this summer. The programs are targeted to students falling behind during remote learning but are available to all North Carolina families.
The bill is designed to encourage student participation by offering core academic courses mixed with enrichment and physical activities. It provides time flexibility to local school districts by prescribing hours requirements instead of days, allowing districts to tailor the program to their specific needs.
Disability Rights NC joined local superintendents in support of the legislation in public comments to the House Education Committee.
"This bill will positively impact students with disabilities who are at risk of retention, particularly middle school and high school students who have been subject to 100% remote instruction for nearly a year," attorney Meisha Evans with Disability Rights NC told the House Education K-12 Committee.
"There are students with disabilities who do not have access to remote instruction due to the nature and severity of their disability. This bill will give students with disabilities a chance to make up some of the critical in-person instruction that they lost."
   Harnett County Schools Superintendent Dr. Aaron Fleming spoke in favor of the legislation on Tuesday.
"There's no doubt that losing close to a full year of full-time, face-to-face instruction, we are starting to see a lot of loss of learning in our student population," Dr. Fleming said.
"Being physically present in a classroom with a quality teacher is best for our students. This bill will help us in regaining some, but certainly not all, of this time back. It is an opportunity for our students at the most significant risk of falling behind to catch up and prepare for the next grade level or course."
Mt. Airy City Schools Superintendent Dr. Kim Morrison said her district had over 400 students attend a summer program in 2020, and the success of those classes informed her support for the bill.
"Each district is different, in their local context, need for programs, access to resources, and support for students," Dr. Morrison said.
 "I believe that House Bill 82, at its heart, supports what we fundamentally believe, which is that summer programs are a good start to a productive academic school year. Our goal is to work with the state legislature to provide a strong network of support for every student in our state. We appreciate your willingness to give local flexibility when possible, such as allowing districts to decide how many hours are needed each week...and opening the possibility for retirees to come to work."
  Speaker Moore addressed the House Education K-12 Committee on Tuesday. "This bill simply provides for a very robust summer learning program to allow these children to get caught up from missed time away from in-person classes," Speaker Moore said.
"We hear support for this from parents, teachers, administrators, and really from everyone involved, so I hope this bill will get good bipartisan support. It stands for the proposition that we know these children have really had a difficult time with COVID-19, not having that classroom experience, and giving them a very robust summer program."
H.B. 82 was approved by the House Education K-12 Committee and the House Committee on Pensions and Retirement on Tuesday. It was heard in the House Rules Committee and the full state House of Representatives passed it on Wednesday, Feb. 24.
That day the Senate read the bill and it passed its first reading. It as referred to the Committee on Rules and Operations for consideration.
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Enforcement of the
Community Appearance Code

(March 4, 2021 Issue)

The Codes Enforcement Department asks the citizens of Kings Mountain for their participation in cleaning up their property of junk and litter. The Community Appearance Code is a city adopted ordinance that regulates the open storage of junk and litter located on private property.
 A Codes Enforcement Officer will issue notices of violations to property owners and tenants of properties in violation of this ordinance which may include a civil penalty of $50 for each day that a violation continues to exist.
The main objective for the enforcement of this ordinance is to establish and maintain clean neighborhoods for the enjoyment and comfort of our citizens. Thanks for your support in helping to make Kings Mountain a beautiful place to call home. For more information please contact the Codes Enforcement Department at 704-734-4561.
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First Baptist Kindergarten
 CLASS OF 1968

(February 24, 2021 Issue)

Dale Greene shared this photo for our readers. Pictured front row L-R: Dale Greene, Janice Ivey, Rhonda Ross, Jane Hambright, Rhonda Guy, Ann Ballard, Brent Shytle, and Trent Thomasson. Back row, L-R: Chris Hinson, Terry Bumgardner, Jennifer Pruitt, Wally Davis, Craig Champion, Steve Crawford and Mike Cornwell.  

 
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A destroyed home on Cambria Court in Ocean Ridge Plantation, Brunswick County, NC. Photo Weather.gov

KM native survives
Brunswick County tornado

(February 24, 2021 Issue)

By Loretta Cozart

On Monday, February 15, an F-3 tornado touched down in Brunswick County, NC at approximately 11:45 pm, traveling at 160 MPH and leaving a 22-mile path of destruction in its wake. Three were killed and 10 were injured in the freak tornado. Residents had a five-minute warning before the tornado hit. Kings Mountain native Renae Nolen Pruitt and her husband lived through the tornado in a neighborhood nearby.
“It was devastating. The tornado hit about 2-miles away in a retirement community called Ocean Ridge Plantation. Houses there are brick, and two homes were totally demolished. There was nothing left of them but the foundation,” Pruitt said. “We were experiencing a bad storm. Right before the tornado hit, we heard a BOOM when a transformer blew out. The lightening was so bright and every window lighted up. Then the power went off.”
“We got a tornado warning on our phones about 5 minutes before the tornado touched down. I heard a sound like that of a train and thought, ‘There are no trains near here,’” Pruitt said. “That was when I realized I was hearing a tornado. After it hit, we went without power from 11:50 pm until 4 pm Tuesday.”
“The Doppler Radar is in Shallotte and it is about 30-years old. We didn’t get much warning,” Pruitt said.
The American Red Cross arrived Tuesday morning and provided shelter and distributed hot meals to people whose homes were damaged Monday night.
“The police told people not to go to the neighborhood to see the damage, and they are not letting anyone into Ocean Ridge.” Volunteers are helping with the clean-up and local restaurants are providing them food, according to Pruitt. “Local sources estimate that 50 homes were damaged.”
The houses there are ripped to shreds, cars and houses are all messed up. Two houses were completely destroyed, but right next door the house was fine. It is crazy how that happened,” Pruitt said. “This tornado just came out of nowhere and we are just thankful to be alive.”
Wednesday, Governor Roy Cooper visited Ocean Ridge Plantation to survey damage following the tornado that touched down in the community on Monday night. Governor Cooper spoke with local emergency management officials as well as homeowners already beginning to recover from the tornado.
“People in Brunswick County were hit hard by this ferocious tornado and we want to make state resources available as much as possible,” said Gov. Cooper.
   State emergency management and State Highway Patrol have been on the scene since Monday night and continue to assess damage to determine what resources may be available to assist in recovery efforts. 
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COVID-19 Vaccine update

(February 24, 2021 Issue)

The Cleveland County Public Health Center’s COVID Vaccine Appointment Line (980-484-6019) is open every Friday beginning at 1 pm to schedule appointments for the next week. The line remains open until all available appointments for the next week are filled.
Several weeks ago, NC Department of Health and Human Services (NC DHHS) announced NC will transition to Group 3 (Child Care/Pre-K-12) effective February 24. As a result, the Cleveland County Public Health Center has begun working with local schools to schedule eligible school employees for next week’s vaccine clinic. The health department is already making plans for school clinics.
"We are working directly with our local schools to schedule these appointments,”. Depending on our dose allocation, we also anticipate beginning to schedule appointments for childcare workers through our COVID Vaccine Appointment Line on Friday for a clinic on Feb. 24 as well.”
Next week, Cleveland County Public Health Center will begin vaccinating Group 3 (Education staff in Pre-K – 12th grade and Childcare workers) in accordance with the NC Vaccine Prioritization Framework. They plan to begin vaccinating other essential frontline workers in Group 3 beginning on March 10. More details for scheduling these appointments will be released as this date approaches.
School employees whose school administration has communicated with them about vaccine scheduling should not call the COVID Vaccine Appointment Line to schedule appointments for next week. This will lead to duplication and take away from available appointments for other eligible recipients.
The public is advised to continue to monitor the Cleveland County Public Health Center’s Facebook page and website for more information regarding scheduling as well as any additional Pop-Up Vaccination Clinics that may occur between regularly scheduled clinics.
Cleveland County Public Health began scheduling appointments for childcare workers last Friday through its COVID Vaccine Appointment Line for their vaccine clinic this week. Childcare workers, as well as individuals in Group 1 or Group 2 that have not yet received their vaccine, may call our COVID Vaccine Appointment Line (980-484-6019) on Friday beginning at 1 pm. Once all available appointments are filled for next week, the phone lines will be closed, and you will receive an automated message stating all appointments have been filled.
   In accordance with NC DHHS guidance, Cleveland County Public Health plans to begin vaccinating other essential frontline workers beginning March 10. Continue to follow Cleveland County Public Health on Facebook and check their website for updated information on scheduling for other essential frontline workers.
As of February 19, the total COVID-19 First Dose Vaccines received by Cleveland County Health Department was 8,100. Of those, 6,866 first doses have been administered, or 85%. Appointments scheduled for Feb. 20 were 960. As of last Saturday, Cleveland County Health Department has administered 97% of the first dose vaccines, according to their Facebook page.
As of February 19, there have been a total of 9,987 cases of COVID-19 in Cleveland County. There are an estimated 231 active cases and 9,545 cases have recovered. There are currently 11 Cleveland County residents who are hospitalized, and the county has had a total of 211 COVID-related deaths.

Food Pantry open Feb. 25

(February 24, 2021 Issue)

The Good Neighbors food pantry at East Gold Street Wesleyan church will be open Thursday, February 25th from 5:30 - 6:15 pm. Drive around to the back of the church and they will deliver to your car. 

Ministerial  Association meeting

(February 24, 2021 Issue)

The ministers of the Kings Mountain Ministerial Association will have their monthly meeting on Thursday, March 4, at 12:00 at Italian Gardens in Kings Mountain.  All local pastors and staff ministers are invited to come and be a part of the meeting.
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Dixon School

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

Last week, Dale Greene shared a photo taken at Dixon School. Names of the students were also shared, but several first names were omitted. If you know any of those names, see a mistake, or if you have old photos like this you want to share, email loretta@kmherald.com. Students pictured L-R. Row 1 kneeling: John Logan, Marshal VanDyke, James VanDyke, ? Black, John O. VanKyile, Buddy Huffman, Arshall Sanders, Wilford Morris, Marshal Cash, and ? Johnson. Row 2 standing: ? Black, Orville Sellers, Joe Biddix, Ralph Stewart, Irene Greene, Nell Howell, William Aullender, Gertrude Ferris, Prentice Hambright, and Mary Childers. Row 3: Armitty Farris, Litha Cavney, Helen Greene, Sarah Ann VanDyke, Maxine Eubanks, John Lewis Hughes, Ted Farris, ? Bell, Arthur Howell, and Dougless Eubanks. Row 4: ? Bell, Lid Black, Buck Stewart, Teacher Hazel Lee, Gene Farris, Clarence Johnson, Herman Greene, and James Childers.

 
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History of Kings Mountain High School

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

By Loretta Cozart

Kings Mountain High School celebrates its 145th birthday this year. In Nov. 1951, Kings Mountain High School journalism students interviewed members of the community regarding the school’s history for a five-segment story. At that time, the school was a mere 75 years old.
This segment was written from interviews with S.S. Weir.The history of Kings Mountain High School was written by students at Kings Mountain High School’s journalism class Nov. 23, 1951, with the help of S.S. Weir.
The first free school in the Kings Mountain community, serving children from the old gold mine through the surrounding county, was a one-room building located on the present lot of Mrs. G. D. Hambright, on Battleground Avenue. The property then was owned by W.M. Falls.
The seats were made of heavy, unpainted slabs with fastened to the backside. They had no backs. Desks were not used and there was one blackboard on legs. The pupils used chalk similar to that in use today. Students used slates for figuring but used copy books, pen, and ink for practicing penmanship. To one side of the room was fastened special writing board, planned smooth and about two inches thick. The ink was kept on the board. There was a special bench for it and the children went to their bench to practice penmanship. On one side of the room there was a rock chimney and an open fireplace in which wood was burned. The students cut the wood, made the fires, and cleaned the room.
   The teachers were hired by free school committeemen, who relied on their own judgement in selecting someone capable of teaching. There were no special requirements for teachers in that day. The term consisted of three months of free school each year. Generally, the fourth month was paid for by subscription, the charge being about $1 per child. Those who could not pay stopped.
Pupils started school at the age of five and had the privilege of attending until they were twenty-one. The majority stopped before they were fifteen because they had to go to work. There were no grades, and pupils advanced as fast as they could learn in each subject.
Subjects studied were penmanship, arithmetic, spelling, and reading. Students used the “Blue Back Speller” for the reading and spelling textbook. The reading material was printed between the lists of words at the top and bottom of the page. Reading consisted of practical sentences or clever sayings.
The only arithmetic textbook was handed down from parent to child until it was completely worn out.
To protect the pages of the book from wearing, students used “thumb papers,” pieces of paper about the size of a dollar bill, folded and held so that the thumb would rest on it instead of the book page. Mr. Weir recalled that he used Confederate money because paper was exceedingly scarce, and the family owned a bushel of Confederate bills. The school lasted from 8 am to 4 pm with one hour for dinner. Students brought lunches with them and played games after eating.
About 1871 Boyce Falls wished to build a house near the site of the school; therefore the one room building was moved beyond the present railroad track below Crescent Hill near a good gum spring. A gum spring is one that is surrounded by four planks, about two-feet long, nailed together and place so as to keep out trash.
  During recess boys and girls played separately. One favorite game of the box was fox. One boy as the fox  would run and the others would chase him.
Another favorite game was bull pen, played with soft a wool-yarn ball made by students. The thrower tried to hit a boy by throwing a ball at him. The purpose was to avoid being hit.
Still another favorite was round cat, which was also played with a yarn ball. Boys used a paddle to knock the ball and if a boy didn’t throw the ball so that the others  could hit it, he was taken out. Round cat was a forerunner of present day baseball.
Baseball was first brought from New York by the Stewart Brothers, who ran the gold mine. The gold mine organized a team called the “Gold Mine Nine,” Nine young men from the Kings Mountain community then organized and called themselves the Kings Mountain Nine. Two of the first players were the late Captain Freno Dilling and Phillip Baker. After Captain Bell opened the Military Academy, the Kings Mountain Nine became the Bell Nine.
Kings Mountain then erected a one room building on the present site of the Teacherage, which until a building was erected for Captain Bell, served the children living in the center of town and toward East School.
At the same time, the late A. F. Weir, a school committeeman, erected a one-room school on his property just above the present W.T. Weir Store at the Park Yarn Mill. That building except for a new roof, stands today, and is used by W.T. Weir as a warehouse.
   Mr. Weir made double desks, with a back rest for the pupils. At the front of the room was a recitation bench. When a class was ready for their teacher to hear their lesson, the members sat on the bench. They stood when they were called to recite.
   Mr. Weir bought a chart on a frame that had reading and spelling on it. Students could turn the leave and read something different from what was on the Blue Back Speller. The school served the children from the Gold Mine Community to Pott’s Creek, which rises near the depot and runs this side of Nebo.
Colored children attended a small school that was built for them in the community. Later they went to a school near the Gold Mine.
Practically everybody was in the same spelling class regardless of age and knowledge.
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RECIPE CORNER

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

BBQ BEEF PATTIES

Bertha Blalock
1 lb. ground beef
¾ cup dry oatmeal
2/3 cup evaporated milk
1 chopped onion
Salt and pepper to taste
Combine and make into small patties and brown lightly on both sides.
Make sauce and pour over patties in deep baking dish.
Sauce:
4 tsp. Worcestershire 
   sauce
2 Tbsp. vinegar
3 Tbsp. sugar
½ cup water
2/3 cup catsup
Bake at 375 degrees for 35 to 45 minutes.

MEAL IN A DISH
Nadine Turner
1 1/4 lb. ground beef
2 c. macaroni cooked as 
   directed
1 can black-eyed peas, 
   rinsed
1 (18 oz.) medium salsa
1 med. onion
Saute ground beef and onion in large frying pan; cook macaroni as directed. Add salsa and rinsed black-eyed peas. Stir together and enjoy.

SUNDAY POT ROAST
Eva L. Moss
2 to 3 lbs. boneless 
   sirloin beef roast
3 cups quartered
   potatoes
2 cups carrot chunks
2 cups onion rings, raw
Cook roast in slow cooker for 3 or 4 hours. Just before leaving for Sunday School, add raw vegetables, continue cooking. This will be ready when you return from worship service. Make a salad and warm a few rolls. Lunch is ready.

RANCH STYLE SLAW
Becky White
1 head cabbage
4 carrots
1 bottle Ranch-style 
   dressing
1 tsp. celery seeds
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. pepper
Grate cabbage and carrots. Add Ranch dressing to desired consistency/ Add celery seeds, salt and pepper. Mix together. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

EARTHQUAKE CAKE
Peggy Henderson
1 c. pecans, chopped
1 c. shredded coconut
1 box German chocolate 
  cake mix
1 stick butter, melted.
1 (8 oz.) cream cheese
1 box 10X powdered 
   sugar
Spread pecans in bottom of pan; place 1 cup coconut on top of nuts. Mix cake mix as directed. Pour over coconut. Melt butter and cream cheese. Add powdered sugar and pour over cake mix. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Leave in 13x9x2 inch pan.
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Daisies and Butterflies - Mixed Media by Annie Sylling

Upcoming Art Classes at Southern Arts Society (SASi)

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

By Jewel Reavis

Southern Arts Society announces upcoming classes for March and April. Students must pre-register and pay in advance to reserve your seat. Call SASi at 704-739-5585 or visit in person for details and class prices. Class sizes are very limited to provide adequate social distancing. Students must wear a face covering during the class.
For a list of upcoming programs, meetings and exhibits Email SouthernArtsSociety@gmail.com or visit their website at www.SouthernArtsSociety.org.
Southern Arts Society (SASi) Gift Shop & Gallery is located at 301 N. Piedmont Ave. at the intersection of Piedmont and Battleground Avenues, Kings Mountain, NC, in the historic Southern Railway Depot.
SASi offers a gift shop, ongoing exhibits and art competitions, programs and classes in a variety of media for artists of all levels. Gallery Hours: Tues-Wed-Thurs-Sat 10 am to 2 pm. All visitors and are required to wear a mask due to COVID-19.
• Intro to Rigid Heddle Weaving with Sue Helmken
Date: Saturday, March 6, 2021   Time:  10 am - 1 pm
All materials are included.  Looms are provided for class use. Open to all levels. The simple design of rigid heddle looms make them the perfect weaving loom for anyone wishing to learn the craft.  The most common types of projects are scarves, placemats, dishtowels, or shawls. You can also weave fabric and then sew it with other fabrics to create garments or bags.
For this class, the looms will already be set up. Sue will demonstrate how to set up the loom, then you will dive right into weaving. Sue will cover color blending, creating texture, lace techniques, pick-up, knotting/shag and more.  A wide variety of yarns will be available for you to sample and explore.  You'll leave with a colorful sampler and a greater understanding of the weaving process.
• Inkle Loom Weaving with Sue Helmken
Date:  Saturday, March 13, 2021  Time:  10 am-1 pm
All materials are included. Looms are provided for class use. Open to all levels. Inkle looms, also known as belt looms, are characterized by a wooden framework upon which dowels have been fastened. They are used to make narrow strips of cloth that can be used for belts, straps, edgings, and fringe. The basics can be learned in one easy lesson, which makes this a great starting point for anyone interested in weaving.  In this class, you will make a sample at least a yard long showing how different sizes and types of yarn affect the pattern and then try variations on the basic weaving.
• Pottery Classes - Next Session begins April 12 thru June 21. (There are 4 sessions in the year) SASi offers both Day and Night classes for beginners, intermediate or advanced persons working in hand building or on the wheel. Classes meet twice weekly Mon and Thurs for 10 weeks. Day Class meets 9 AM till noon. Night Class meets 6-8 PM.  Class Fee includes 1 bag of clay, glazes, use of studio tools and instruction. Additional clay may be purchased onsite. Details: Night Classes Rhonda Withers 704-773-6138, Day Classes Renee Matthews 704-674-4517.
• The Joy of Color Strength in Paintings with Anne Harkness
Date: Saturday April 17   Time: 1-4 pm
Skill Level: Beginning to Intermediate
This class is recommended for oil and acrylic painters (watercolor painters are welcome but will have to do some gleaning). The instructor will teach using oil paints.
Description: Color, design, and paint application are a few of the important ingredients that go into a strong painting. We will mix paint and create studies while in class.  The concepts of color family, and mood, will be discussed. If you want to strengthen your paintings or just have an infusion of joy, pop in for this class.
For supply list: see www.SouthernArtsSociety.org under the class page or Email us.
• Working and painting with Collage with Annie Sylling
Dates: Fri April 30 & Sat May 1
Skill Level: Beginning to Intermediate (knowledge of color mixing will be helpful)  This class runs for two sessions so that your collage can dry before you apply paint.
First session – Friday April 30 from 6-8 pm (2 hours) Collaging: using different papers/cut-outs, Layout and pasting.
Second Session – Saturday May 1st from 11 am to 1 pm (3 hours) Painting: underpainting, subject outline and subject painting.
For supply list: see www.SouthernArtsSociety.org under the class page or Email us.
Printing on a Gelli Plate with Dianne Garner
Date: To be determined
Skill Level: Beginning to Intermediate (knowledge of color mixing will be helpful)
For supply list: see www.SouthernArtsSociety.org under the class page or Email us.
More classes coming soon!  Please check the  website and Facebook page for details.

Hospice Cleveland County 
Hearts For Hospice

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

Hospice Cleveland County would like to thank Morgan Elliott for putting together snack baskets for families visiting their loved ones at Wendover Hospice House. Each had a beautiful card attached. Morgan is from Lawndale and a graduate of Burns High School. She is currently a Sophomore at UNC Charlotte majoring in Pre-Nursing and minoring in Public Health. “We appreciate Morgan for taking the time to do this for our Hospice families.” To learn how you can help Hospice Cleveland County, call 704-487-4677 or visit their website at www.hospicecares.cc. Hearts for Hospice Fundraiser is going on now until February 26th.  Hearts can be purchased at several locations including the Hospice Administration Building (951 Wendover Heights Dr., Shelby), The Hospice Store (1450 E. Dixon Blvd., Shelby) and the Testa Family Hospice House (321 Kings Mountain Blvd., Kings Mtn.).  For a full list of locations, please call 704-751-3573. Hearts can also be purchased online at Eventbrite.com.  Your support is appreciated.
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The US Monument at Kings Mountain National Military Park in fog. Photo provided by NPS

Fun activities for the entire family

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

By Loretta Cozart


Despite the fact that winter is here in full force, there still are plenty of activities to enjoy with your family. From special presentations you can watch at home, to quick road trips just to get out of the house, there are a variety of things to do to entertain your family nearby.
   The library has several programs scheduled through the end of the month:
• Zoom Storytime with Miss Anne
   Zoom Storytime with Miss Anne on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday at 10:30 am. Visit www.mauneylibrary.org event calendar to register.
• Afternoon Adventures: Magic at Home!
   Thursday, February 11 at 4 pm,  Afternoon Adventures: Magic at Home! Caleb Sigmon of Sigmon Theatrical presents a live interactive magic show on the Mauney Library Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/mauneylibrary.
• North Carolina Slave Narratives
   Monday, February 22 at 6 pm webinar, Laurel Sneed, veteran history educator and media producer, will talk about three 19th century African Americans from North Carolina who resisted slavery by escaping to freedom and writing about their experiences. The narratives or memoirs are by authors Harriet Jacobs, of Edenton; Moses Roper, of Caswell County; and William H. Singleton, of New Bern.
   Sneed has been teaching educators and members of the general public about the era of slavery for over two decades through the Crafting Freedom Institute, an African American history education organization for which she serves as executive director. Through CFI, Sneed has brought 1000+ teachers to North Carolina from around the country and several foreign countries to study slavery, with a focus on enslaved and free black North Carolinians in the 19th century. This webinar will include several short videos Sneed produced dramatizing the words of two of the authors. There will be opportunities to ask questions throughout. Visit www.mauneylibrary.org event calendar to join Zoom event.
• Mauney Library book club, A Company of Readers
   Tuesday, February 23 at 3 pm  join the official Mauney Library book club, A Company of Readers, for a virtual Zoom meeting. Visit www.mauneylibrary.org calendar to join the event.
• Black Men in White Coats
Mauney Memorial Library is screening the documentary Black Men in White Coats beginning at noon on Friday, February 26 through Sunday, February 28.
   Dr. Dale Okorodudu, founder of Black Men in White Coats, hopes to provide role- models for others, the same way he had great mentors that looked like him to help him on his path to becoming a doctor.
   Learn more about Black Men in White Coats at www.blackmeninwhitecoats.com, and register for the screening at www.mauneylibrary.org or call 704-739-2371.
For questions, or to join our Friends of the Library, email info@mauneylibrary.org or call the library at (704) 739-2371. The Friends of the Mauney Memorial Library thank the community for its continued support.
There are plenty of opportunities to get outside and enjoy a beautiful day with your family.
• Kings Mountain boasts its own Gateway Trail. If your little ones are too small for along hike, the area around the Trailhead will be plenty to keep the entertained and get some exercise. If you prefer a longer walk, you can plan a longer hike at Crowders Mountain State Park, Kings Mountain State Park, or Kings Mountain National Military Park. Be sure to check-in at the Visitor’s Center so they know where you are hiking.
    •    If you do not feel like taking a long hike, the historical trail at Kings Mountain National Military Park is only a 1.5 mile battlefield loop takes you past monuments and markers along the trail. Because the battlefield is also a burial ground, picnics are not allowed. However, picnics are allowed at Kings Mountain State Park. If you prefer to visit from the comfort of your home, visit a virtual tour at https://kimo.oncell.com/en/index.html.
• Visitors at Kings Mountain State Park can enjoy fishing for bass, bream, crappie, and catfish from a rental Jon Boat in the park’s 65-acre Lake York. Bank fishing is allowed on 13-acre Lake Crawford. A South Carolina fishing license is required. Picnics are allowed.
   Personal kayaks, canoes and non-motorized john boats may be launched at Lake Crawford and Lake York for a $5/day charge. Watercraft must be carried to the shore from the parking area. Visitors may obtain a permit at the Trading Post or park office. Non-motorized fishing boats rent for $20/day.
   Canoe and kayak rentals are offered at the 13-acre Lake Crawford. Check with the park for availability.
   Wireless Internet Access: Complimentary Wi-Fi is available at Kings Mountain State Park.
   Playground Equipment is available, and the Park Store/Gift Shop is available on weekends from March-Nov. Picnic Shelters make a great play area for imaginative play and a playground is located near Shelter 2.
   Geocaching: Geocaching is permitted. Several geocaches are located on the park. For more information visit the official geocaching website.
   Biking is allowed, but there is no bike trail at the park. Visitors may ride bikes on paved roads.
   The park has a volleyball court, basketball court and ping pong table available for visitor use.
   Equestrian Camping: The equestrian camping area includes 15 equestrian campsites which rent for $12/site/night. Central water is available and privy toilets are nearby. Equestrian campsite reservations are required. The park’s 30+ miles of equestrian trails connect to the national park’s equestrian trails.
   The park has several hiking trails. The 16-mile Kings Mountain Hiking Trail, the 1.5-mile Farm Trail and the 1.8-mile Ridgeline Trail. The Ridgeline Trail provides a unique trail experience connecting three parks and two states. The trail connects Kings Mountain State Park, Kings Mountain National Military Park and Crowder's Mountain State Park in North Carolina. The .7-mile Nature Trail at the park provides a leisurely walk.
• If getting out of town is more to your family’s taste, take a road trip to western NC and enjoy a drive along US Route 64, the longest numbered route in all of NC, stretching 604 miles. This drive is also called North Carolina Waterfalls Byway. The route takes you down a windy two-lane road that passes many waterfalls including Bust Your Butt Falls, Dry Falls, Bridal Veil Falls, Silver Run Falls, Rainbow Falls, Upper Whitewater Falls, and Toxaway Falls, to mention a few. Many of the falls can be seen from your car so you can stay warm while enjoying the scenery.

Items needed for Hospice

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

Hospice Cleveland County is in need of the following items:
Pill planners (twice a day and four times a day), antibacterial hand soap (8-12 oz.), hand sanitizer (8-12 oz.), hypo allergenic baby wipes, baby monitors and sippy cups (no straw), 16 oz. cups (hot and cold), heavy duty Styrofoam plates, plastic forks and spoons, mini fire extinguishers and smoke alarms, individual beverages: canned sodas, fruit drinks, water, individual wrapped snack items: cakes, cookies, chips, soups, cereals, fruits, puddings, candy bars, peanut butter, oatmeal, grits and apple sauce, paper towels, toilet tissue, family size boxes of tissues, monetary donations for other patient needs.
Please drop off items at the Hospice Administration building located at 951 Wendover Heights during business hours.
For more information call 704-487-4677. Your support is appreciated.
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Prescribed fire may be used to maintain a cultural landscape, such as on a battlefield. Photo provided by NPS

Series of prescribed burns scheduled through end of May

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

 NPS Superintendent Diana Bramble announced that Kings Mountain National Military Park will be conducting a series of prescribed burns within the park boundaries through the end of May 20.
   Locations to be burned include:
• Battlefield burn unit – 175 acre area that is located north of the main park drive and includes the area around the visitor center. Prescribed burns will be performed in multiple sections throughout the inner loop of the battlefield trail, and the outer loop of the trail.
• Piedmont burn unit – 144 acre area that is located south of the main park drive and the battlefield. The unit is flanked by the horse trail on the eastern boundary, main park drive on the northern boundary, Whitworth fire road on the western boundary, and the boundary shared with Kings Mountain State Park to the south.
Wildland fire crews are working to prepare these units for safe and effective prescribed burns, which are conducted in accordance with the approved fire management plan and as weather conditions allow throughout the spring season. Surrounding communities may expect minimal smoke and visibility impacts during the burns. Some access to trails and grounds within the burn areas may be temporarily restricted during burn activities for visitor and wildland fire crew safety.
The timing of the prescribed burn implementation is dependent upon a variety of conditions as burns are conducted within specific parameters that consider temperature, relative humidity, fuel moisture, wind speed, and wind direction.
   Fire is an essential and natural process that has shaped the landscape of Kings Mountain National Military Park for thousands of years. Prescribed burns are conducted at the park to reduce the risk of wildland fire, and to restore native vegetation and historic landscapes. All areas of historic, cultural, and ecological importance are identified and protected throughout the planning and implementation of prescribed burns.  

Man-Up Men’s  Conference
at Christian  Freedom

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

Christian Freedom Church will hold their Man Up Men’s conference with Nikita Koloff on Saturday, February 20, 9:00 a.m.-2:30 p.m. The theme is “Restoring Biblical Manhood”.
 Cost is $20. Lunch included. The church is located at 246 Range Rd., Kings Mountain, NC 28086. Contact: Ron Carroll for more information at roncarroll@live.com

Hospice Hearts
available through Feb. 26

(February 17, 2021 Issue)

Hospice Cleveland County “Hearts for Hospice” area available through February 26. For $1 or more donation, you can purchase a heart in honor or in memory of a loved one and display it in your home, office, church, anywhere you wish.
Hearts can be purchased at the Hospice Administration Building or online at Evenbrite.com. Online orders will be emailed a heart to print and display. Don’t forget to tag us them Facebook with your hearts so they can be shared. Packets are available for businesses, groups, individuals to sell by calling 704-751-3573. All donations due no later than March 12.
Proceeds support the general operations of Hospice Cleveland County.
For more information call 704-487-4677 or www.hospicecares.cc
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Schiele Museum Winter Wonderland

(February 11, 2021 Issue)

The Schiele Museum, 1500 E. Garrison Blvd.,  has opened its newest, original exhibit Winter Wonderland.  Winter Wonderland will be an adventure geared towards the youngest visitors to the museum as participants are urged to take off their shoes and sock “skate.”  It was opened to the public on Saturday, Jan. 16th for just $3 per person and will be free for Schiele Members. Tickets can be reserved online in advance at SchieleMusem.org. The exhibit is currently scheduled to be open through March 2021.
Winter Wonderland is fashioned to look like an outdoor pond that has iced over.  The winter scene is complete with taxidermy mounts of deer bounding through the forest and other wildlife peeking at the skaters. Children up to age 12 will be able to kick off their shoes and skate off some energy, practice some ice skating techniques, or just enjoy twirls and sliding across the floor.
As the coronavirus continues to be a concern for our community, The Schiele staff wanted to provide a low-contact experience for our youngest visitors to enjoy.  An anonymous sponsor provided support to help make this exhibit possible.  The Winter Wonderland experience will give children a way to exercise while having fun as families enjoy spending time together.
The museum has also opened its weekly Friday Night Light programs scheduled through February. These special planetarium programs will be offered each Friday evening at 5 PM, 6 PM, & 7 PM and will give families, couples, and adults an opportunity to experience a planetarium program after hours. New programs will be available each week, from live star shows to science theater programs from across the national planetarium industry. Limited seating provides ample room for visitors to spread out and pick their favorite seats to enjoy the show.
For more information, please visit schielemuseum.org or follow The Schiele Museum on social media.